Naval Dockyards Society

Exploring the civil branches of navies & their material culture

Combined index to Transactions volumes 1, 2, and 3

Volume 1 was the Ninth Annual Conference, 2005: Portsmouth Dockyard in the Age of Nelson

Volume 2 was the Eighth Annual Conference, 2004: Gibraltar as a Naval Base and Dockyard

Volume 3 comprised:

The Fifth Annual Conference, 2001. Naval Dockyards: Changes in Material and Technology

The Sixth Annual Conference, 2002. Naval Dockyards as Employer–Employee Communities

The Seventh Annual Conference, 2003. Preservation, Conservation and the Re-use of Dockyard Sites and Buildings

References to illustrations are in italics. Dates in brackets after ships’ names are launch dates. Ranks and titles are generally those held at the time of reference in Transactions.

Please note that a downloadable, printable PDF version of this index in A4 format is available for Members in the Members’ Area.

A

Abbot, Charles  1.69

Abraham, Israel  1.104

Ackworth, Sir Jacob, Surveyor of the Navy  3.11

Acre: commandery of the Order of St John  3.66

Addington, Henry, Prime Minister

     appoints Earl St Vincent First Lord of the Admiralty  1.59

     resigns  1.60

Admiraal De Suffren (Dutch East India Company ship)  1.102, 103

Admiralty

     Committee to advise on discoveries and inventions (1829)  1.18

     copper bolts replace iron in the Swallow (14), HMS (1769)  3.17

     copper sheathing trial (1761)  3.13

     copper sheathing trial (1763)  3.15; see also copper

     coppering programme for sloops and frigates (1776–77)  3.19

     coppering programme for the fleet (1779–80)  3.22

     Earl St Vincent, First Lord, see St Vincent, Admiral Sir John Jervis, Earl

     Industrial Council (1963)  3.85

     Labour Section  2.74, 75

     Mr Brisbane’s composition against shipworm  3.17

     Mr Jackson’s liquid against shipworm  3.17

     relationship with Navy Board  1.9

     Second Sea Lord’s offices move to Portsmouth  3.90

     Sir Charles Yorke, First Lord, see Yorke, Sir Charles

     Way Ahead Committee (1955)  3.83

Admiralty boroughs (after 1832)  3.79

Admiralty Inspector General of Naval Works, see Inspector General of Naval Works

Admiralty Progress Books, hold near complete records of ships entering Portsmouth Dockyard  1.50

Adventure (32/34), HMS (1646)  2.23, 24

Aetna (bomb), HMS (1803)  2.83

Africa, HMS (1905)  3.85

Agamemnon (64), HMS (1781)  2.83

Agamemnon, HMS (1906)

     build time  3.49n19

     guns sent to HMS Dreadnought  3.41, 49n19

agents victualler and victualling agents

     instructions for  2.56

     responsibilities of  2.56–7

     salary of  2.60

     victuallers to the fleet  2.63

     Victualling Board, see Victualling Board

     see also Bolton, Thomas; Brown, Nicholas; Cutforth, James; Ford, Richard; Heatley, David; St Michel, Balthazar; Vaughan, ?; Wilkie, Patrick; Wills, William; Yeo, James

al-Ashraf Khalil, Sultan: besieges Acre (1291)  3.66

Alarm (32), HMS (1758)

     coppered for a voyage to Jamaica (1761)  3.13

     coppering surveyed at Woolwich (1763)  3.13, 14, 21

     re-coppered for a voyage to Jamaica (1763)  3.14, 28n44

     repaired in Havana harbour (1762)  3.13

     surveyed at Woolwich (1766)  3.15–16

     wooden sheathing replaces copper (1769)  3.16

Albemarle, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

Albion Flour Mills, London  1.65

Alexandria Dockyard  2.73

     working party of final year apprentices (1941)  2.74

Algeçiras, Bay of  2.10

     British attack on (1727)  2.36

     hospitals at (1726)  2.32

     magazine at (1726)  2.32

Algiers: Barbary regency  2.11, 12

Alliance, USS (1778): coppered (1781)  3.23

Allcott, John: Storekeeper at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.104

Allen, William, of the Royal Institution: and the presentation of Robert Seppings’ system (19 November 1811)  1.12

Allin, Sir Thomas  2.23

Amazon (38), HMS (1799): sheathed with recycled copper from the Metal Mills  1.74–75

America (60), HMS (1777), part-coppered (1760)  3.12

Amphitrite (24), HMS (1778), fitted with mixed-metal parts  3.20

anchors: mixed metal more economic than iron  1.25

Anglesey, copper mines  3.19, 23

Ann transport (1800)  2.62

Ansbach, Margravine of: visits Portsmouth Dockyard  1.93

Antigua: water collection at  2.84

Apollo (36), HMS (1799): sailors paid off cause problems in Portsmouth (April 1802)  1.99

Apsey, J., Head of the Construction Department, Portsmouth Dockyard (1910)  3.49n19

Aranjuez, Convention of  2.52

Arethusa (38), HMS (1781): sailors paid off cause problems in Portsmouth (April 1802)  1.99

Ariadne (20), HMS (1776), coppered at Chatham (1776)  3.19

Ariadne, HMS (1898): Pollen’s fire-control system  3.45

Ariel (20), HMS (1777): copper sheathing and mixed metal braces and pintles (1777)  3.20

Argo Company  3.47

Argo fire-control system  3.43, 45–6, 47–8, 50n42, 50n55

Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick  3.42, 49n19

army, British

     regiments

          Bissett’s regiment  2.32

          25th Foot  2.42

          29th Foot  2.42

          72nd Foot  2.39

          73rd Foot  2.38

     battalions

          Clayton’s  2.35

          Guards  2.35

Arnaud, Elias  1.104

Arrol  3.38

Arsenale d’Italia, Malta: location map  3.67

artificers in the royal dockyards

     paid from the Ordinary budget  3.79

     pay and pensions  3. 77

     politics of  3.79

Artois, Charles Philippe, Comte d’  2.41

Arundel: Thomas Fitzherbert as MP (1780)  1.95

ash: for ship furnishings (14th c.)  3.68

Assistance transport (1800)  2.61

Athenian (64), HMS (ex San Giovanni) (1769)  3.72

Atkins, Samuel  2.27

     describes Gibraltar (1682)  2.23

Attwick, William, ironmaster  3.52

Attwood, Mr, assistant constructor (1905–6)  3.40, 41

Aurora (32), HMS (1776): coppered at Chatham (1769)  3.17, 20

Avery, Philip: contractor for painter’s work, Portsmouth Dockyard  1.96

Ayde, General Sir John  2.67

Aylmer, Matthew  2.20

B

Bacon, Reginald

     Director of Naval Ordnance and Naval Assistant to the First Sea Lord  3.46, 47, 48n3, 49n6, 50n39

     on Naval Defence Act 1889  2.67

Baden-Powell, George  2.67

Bage, Charles, and fireproof textile mills (1790s)  3.31

Bailey (Malta) Ltd.  3.84

bake house, Victualling Board

     built (1740) in King Street, Portsmouth  1.35

     contains only six ovens  1.35

     fire hazard  1.36

     production of biscuit  1.43

Baker, John, commands Sallee squadron  2.13

Baker, William  1.104

Ballantyne, Mr, assistant constructor (1905)  3.40

Baltimore (Co. Cork): attacked by Barbary corsairs  2.9

Banks, Sir Joseph, President of the Royal Society

     and Congo River exploration  1.17

     death (1820)  1.12, 18

     and George III  1.12

     interests, achievements and involvement in naval enquiries  1.12

     at presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.11

     and Royal Society  1.15

Barbary Coast: relations with Britain after the Treaty of Utrecht  2.32

Barfleur (90), HMS (1768): spends 323 days in dry dock (1792–1793) in Portsmouth  1.50

Barham, Charles Middleton, 1st Baron, First Lord of the Admiralty

     Commission for Revising and Digesting the Civil Affairs of His Majesty’s Navy (Commission of Revision)  1.59, 75

     Commission of Naval Enquiry  1.75

     coppering ships  3.21, 22

     ‘prepared paper’ to prevent electrolysis  3.21, 25

     replaced at Admiralty (1806)  1.74

Barlow, Admiral Robert

     Commissioner of Chatham Dockyard  1.17

     Naval Fellow of the Royal Society  1.17

     senior naval officer at Gibraltar (1804)  2.59

Barr and Stroud range finder  3.43, 45, 50n50

Barrallier, Jean Louis, Second Assistant to the Surveyors: reports on Robert Seppings’ submission  1.11

Barrow, John, FRS

     appointed to the Council of the Royal Society (1814)  1.15

     involvement in Robert Seppings’ system  1.10, 12, 15–18

     Second Secretary to the Admiralty (1804–1806 and 1807–1845)  1.10

Barry, Captain Henry Deacon Director of Naval Ordnance (1903–4)  3.47

Bartlett, Mr, copper contractor (1770)  3.29

Base Reuse Committee (US)  3.93

Bately, William, Surveyor of the Navy, and copper sheathing  3.12

Battenberg see Louis of Battenberg

battlecruisers  3.38, 44

Beach, Samuel, superintendent in the Block Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard

     pay  1.71

     progress on constructing two furnaces  1.68

beaches: for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

Beardmore, Dalmuir  3.38, 41, 49n19

Beaufort, Captain Francis: elected to the Royal Society (1814)  1.16

Beckman, Martin, Tangier Master Engineer: on the advantages of Gibraltar  2.24

Bedford, John, quarterman  1.105

Belasm, Mr, assistant constructor (1905)  3.40

Belfast  3.38

Belle (or Balle), Captain Andreas  1.101

Belleisle (74), HMS (1795)  2.83

Bellerophon (74), HMS (1786)  2. 83

Bellerophon, HMS (1907): build time  3.49n19

Bellona (74), HMS (1760)

     coppered model shown to George III  3.22

     James Cutforth as purser (1799)  2.59

Belvidere (East India Company ship): launched at Itchenor (April 1787)  1.93

Benamor, Lieutenant Fell: superintends hoys at Portsmouth (1808–1809)  1.40

Beneficial Society’s Hall, Portsmouth  1.104

Bentham, Jeremy, brother of Samuel, writer on jurisprudence  1.21

Bentham, Samuel: Admiralty Inspector General of Naval Works (1796–1807)

     ascertaining the strength of different metals begun by (1798)  1.25

     bars uneconomic customs used in private yards  1.24

     block-manufacturing machines  1.62

     Block Mills for Portsmouth Dockyard  1.63

     circular fixed saw  1.86

     colonel in the service of Catherine the Great of Russia (from 1780)  1.21

     covered docks and slips

     at Karlscrona, Sweden (1807)  1.26

     Portsmouth Dockyard  1.26

     demonstrates the use of steam engines at Westminster  1.23–24

     deputy (Simon Goodrich, 1805–1807)  1.65

     designs caisson gates for Portsmouth Dockyard 3.34

     develops philosophical principles for the management of industrial organisations  1.22

     directs actual works and production lines  1.22

     fire-proof buildings in the dockyards  1.27

     given the management of the Wood Mills, Metal Mills, and Millwrights at Portsmouth Dockyard by the Navy Board  1.24

     and ‘individual responsibility’  3.75, 76

     inspects all dockyards (1795)  1.59

     introduces cofferdams at Portsmouth Dockyard together with strengthening embankments and quays  1.27

     machine tools at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.24

     mill for making roman cement established at Sheerness Dockyard  1.28

     moves to Navy Board (August 1808)  1.79

     office at the Navy Board abolished (1812)  1.79

     panopticon prison project (1794)  1.27

     papers by him, see ‘statements of services’ papers

     plans for Chatham’s number one slipway, see covered dock and slips

     position equivalent to today’s Integrated Project Team Manager  1.51

     proposes fitting and storing vessels within the dockyard  1.26

     pumps in Portsmouth Dockyard use steam engine  1.23

     and resistance to the introduction of new technology  1.22

     Rosetta Water Tanks, Gibraltar  2.86

     Russian shipbuilding project (1805–1807)  1.79

     sawmill at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.24

     shipbuilding at Redbridge, Hampshire  1.23

     steam-driven woodworking machinery  1.23–24, 45n

     steam engine at Redbridge, Hampshire  1.23

     submits plans to reorganize Portsmouth Dockyard (1795)  1.59

     technologies pioneered by him in the dockyards impossible to implement due to lack of coherent development  1.37

     title or rank of general  1.21

     trains as shipwright  1.60

     Victualling facilities at Portsmouth Dockyard

          inadequacies of  1.35

          new store for (1800–1801)  1.37

     Wood Mill at Chatham Dockyard (1813)  1.25

Bentinck, Lord William  3.76

Beresford, Lord Charles  3.47

Bermuda Dockyard: tourist attraction  3.91

Bernard, Mr, and composition against the shipworm  3.19

Berri, Duke of: visits Portsmouth Dockyard  1.93

Bertaud, Mr, and composition for wood sheathing  3.13

Berwick (70), HMS (1723)  2.34

Beverley, John

     master attendant at Gibraltar  2.24

     master attendant at Tangier  2.21, 22

Bideford: attacked by Barbary corsairs  2.9

Bideford (20), HMS (1718)  2.13, 15

Biles, Professor J. H.  3.48n3

bills of exchange  2.56

Birgu, Malta

     arsenal (16th c.)  3.70

     location map  3.67

Black, John, ‘The Background to the Establishment of a Naval Dockyard at Gibraltar Following the Naval Defence Act of 1889’  2.65–71

‘black stuff’, for sheathing ships  3.10

Blake, Sir Robert, General-at-Sea  2.19

blast furnaces  3.53

Blatherwick, G.  3.52

block contractors, Plymouth Dockyard

     Dunsterville, Bartholomew  1.62

     Dunsterville, William  1.60

Block Mills, Portsmouth: see Portsmouth Royal Dockyard: Block Mills

blockade of the French fleet at Brest, using Torbay as anchorage (from 1798)  1.41

blocks, wood

     inserting metal bushes  1.61

     lignum vitae for  1.61, 66, 90

     machine tools, Brunel not responsible for introduction  1.85

     manufacture of  1.55–58, 61, 85–92

     mortising machine for the shell of pulley blocks, Brunel’s only fully automatic machine  1.87–89

     new table of dimensions  1.61

     supply of, to the Royal Navy  1.56, 60–61

Bluestreak guided missile  3.85, 86

Board of Commissioners for Revising the Civil Affairs of the Navy, see Commission of Revision

Board of Longitude  1.13–14

Bolton, Matthew  3.26

Bolton, Thomas  2.59

bolts, brass 26

bolts, copper, see under copper

bolts, iron  3.20, 25, 26

bolts, mixed-metal  3.26

Bombay: East India Company’s yard builds HMS Malabar (74)  1.16

Bombay Castle (East India Company ship): lent to the Royal Navy as a transport (1780)  1.101

Bombay Castle (74), HMS (1782): while in Ordinary copper-fastened and re-coppered (1786)  3.26

Bombay Dockyard  2.66, 67, 69

Bond, J. R., naval constructor (1905)  3.40

Bor, Brigadier Jacob (1713)  3.62

Boreas transport (1800)  2.62

Borthwick, Captain Richard  2.21, 22

Boscawen, Admiral Edward  2.16

Bo(r)schetti, Gian (or Juan) Maria  2.57, 58, 84, 86

Boulton, Arthur, shipwright  1.105

Boulton, Matthew: works with James Watt and Josiah Wedgwood  1.65

Boulton and Watt  3.52, 52–3

Boulton and Watt steam engines

     installed in HMS Congo  1.17

     at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.80

     used for the first generation of Royal Navy steamships  1.17

Bourbon, Louis Henri, Duc de  2.41

Bowes-Smith, Arthur  1.101

Bowles, Phineas: storekeeper and muster master at Tangier  2.24, 26, 27

Bowmen, AB seaman gunner G. F., RNVR  3.49n35

Boyer’s pneumatic drill  3.38

Boyle, Captain the Hon. Courtenay

     elected to the Royal Society (1814)  1.16

     Naval Fellow of the Royal Society  1.17

Bramah, Joseph  1.86

Brass Company of Bristol see Bristol Brass Company

brass latten, for sheathing ships  3.10, 27

Brassey, Thomas, 1st Earl  2.67

Breadhower, John: Portsmouth bookseller  1.103

Breen, Kenneth, ‘Gibraltar: Pivot of Naval Strategy in 1781’  2.47–54

Brest, blockade of the French fleet at

     in 1781  2.49, 50

     from 1798  1.41

Brilliant (28), HMS (1789)  2.39, 41

Brilliant (East India Company ship): repaired at Portsmouth Dockyard (1782)  1.101

Bridge, Mr, and composition for wood sheathing  3.13

Brisbane, Mr, and composition for wood sheathing  3.17

Brisbane, John: secretary of the Admiralty (1680)  2.22, 23, 24

Brisbane, Commodore John (1779)  3.23

Bristol (48), HMS (1653)  2.22, 23

Bristol Brass Company  3.10, 21

Britannia (100), HMS (1762), coppered using ‘prepared paper’ (1780)  3.22

Britannia, HMS (1904): build time  3.49n19

Brixham reservoir  1.67

Broderick, Vice Admiral Thomas  2.16

Brooks, John  3.45, 47

Brown, D. K.  3.42

Brown, David, Deputy Chief Naval Architect of the Royal Corps of Naval Constructors  3.41

Brown, John  3.38

Brown, Nicholas: agent victualler to the fleet  2.56, 63

‘brown stuff’, for sheathing ships  3.10

Bruce, Captain James A. T.  2.70

Brunel, Marc Isambard

     automatic mortising machine for the shell of pulley blocks  1.87–89

     boring machine  1.86–87

     Chief Engineer, New York  1.62

     circular saw for cutting logs for shells and sheaves for pulley blocks  1.66, 86, 90

     coaking machine  1.91–92

     corner saw  1.89

     helps to train the workmen at the Block Mills, Portsmouth Dockyard  1.22

     introduces the principle of the crank to mortising machines  1.88

     leading light for Maudslay, Bentham and Goodrich  1.85

     machines produced by him are mainly semi-automatic  1.85

     marries Sophia Kingdom, daughter of William Kingdom  1.62

     milling machinery  1.22

     offers his patented machine drawings to the Taylors and to Samuel Bentham  1.62

     proposer for John Knowles’s election to the Royal Society (1822)  1.17

     at the reading of Robert Seppings’ paper (10 March 1814)  1.15

     rounding saw  1.91

bucket dredger driven by steam engine

     completed in Portsmouth Dockyard (1802)  1.28

     designed by Bentham, first of its kind  1.28

     dredging depth reaches 26ft below low water (1812)  1.28

     second dredger built to work in the Thames  1.28

Buckingham, George Villiers, 1st Duke of: Anglo-Spanish War  2.10

Bucknell, Thomas: Builder Assistant at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.104

Budgen or Budger, John: scavelman and landlord  1.104

Bulwark, HMS (1899): build time  3.49n19

Bunce, Samuel

     designs Block Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard with Edward Holl  1.64

     works in the Inspector General’s department (1800)  1.21

Burford (70), HMS (1722)  2.34

Burnett, Sir William (FRS), Director of Medical Services  1.18

Burr, James

     career  1.83n

     works in the Inspector General’s department (1800)  1.21

Burchett, Josiah, Secretary to the Admiralty Board  3.58

Byam Martin, Admiral Sir Thomas: see Martin, Admiral Sir Thomas Byam

Byng, George

     deficiencies of Gibraltar (1709)  2.12

     Mediterranean experience  2.11, 28

Byng, Pattee  2.13

Byron, Commodore the Hon. John  3.15

C

C. H. Bailey  3.84

Cabot, Sebastian  3.10

Cadiz

     alternative to Tangier for the English Mediterranean fleet  2.21, 22

     English attack on (1625)  2.10

     Spanish expedition  2.14

Cadiz fleet (Spanish)  2.14

Cadiz squadron (French)  2.16

Cadiz squadron (Spanish)  2.36

Calcutta (East India Company ship)  1.101

Callaghan, Admiral George, Commander of Home Fleets 1912–14  3.59n31

Callington  3.78

Calvi, Giovanni Battista: constructs Charles V Wall, Gibraltar (16th century)  2.7

Calypso transport (1801)  2.61

Camber: East India Company acquires storage and repair facilities (by 1760)  1.100

Cammell Laird  3.49n19, 85

Campbell, Lt John (1796)  3.76

Campbell, Lt Colin (1780)  2.41

Canterbury (60), HMS (1722)  2.34

canvas, used to prevent electrolysis under copper sheathing  3.15, 16

Cape Clear  2.50

Cape Espartel  2. 52

Cape Palos  2.39

Cape Passaro, Battle of (1718)  2.12

Cape St Mary  2.35, 52

Cape St Vincent  2.52

Cape Spartel  2.14, 15, 35

Cape Trafalgar  2.15

Cape Velez Malaga, Battle of (1704)  2.19

Capello, Giacomo  3.71

careening

     at Gibraltar (1680–82)  2.10

     in Jamaica (1778)  3.20

     in Rhodes (14th c.)  3.68

     at Tangier  2.10

     in Valletta Harbour, Malta (18th c.)  3.71

Careening Bay, Gibraltar  2.68

Carlile, Richard, The Trial  3.78

Carnatic (East India Company ship): lent to the Royal Navy as a transport (1780)  1.101

Carpenter, George, 1st Baron: Governor of Minorca  2.35

Carrier transport (1800)  2.61

Caruana, Peter: and the Rosia Water Tanks  2.81, 83, 86

Carver, Richard: preventative against the ill effects of copper (1784)  3.26

Case for Chatham, The (1957)  3.84

Catherine of Braganza  2.10, 20

Catherine the Great: and Samuel Bentham  1.21

Cavendish, Admiral Philip: commands Sallee squadron  2.13

Cavalier, HMS (1944)  3.85

Centaur (74), HMS (1759), foundered (1782)  3.24, 25

Ceuta  2.15

     Spanish garrison  2.32

Champion, Nehemiah  3.10

Chania naval yard, Crete  3.69

Channel Squadron, English/British

     Gibraltar as shelter for  2.66

     ironclads for  2.65

Charles, Archduke (Charles VI)  2.9

Charles II, King: Mediterranean strategy  2.11

Charles V, Emperor  3.70

Charlotte sloop  2.36

Chatham: as Admiralty borough (after 1832)  3.79

Chatham Royal Dockyard

     battleship building times (1893–1904)  3.49n19

     Bentham’s plans for number one slipway (1811–1812)  1.26

     builds HMS Africa (1905)  3.85

     builds Oberon-class submarines  3.85

     builds submarine C17 (1908)  3.85

     builds submarine X1 (1923)  3.85

     Case for Chatham, The (1957)  3.84

     Cavalier, HMS (1944)  3.85

     chips (dockyard privilege)  1.59, 69, 81, 99

     Clerk of the Checque (1712–16)  3.61, 62

     Clerk of the Ropeyard’s clerk’s pay (1713)  3.62

     Clerk of the Survey’s clerks’ pay (1713)  3.62

     closed (1984)  3.86

     closure proposed (1957–58)  3.83–4, 86

     Commissioners see Barlow, Admiral Robert; Littleton, Captain (later Admiral) James; St Lo, Captain George

     contract labourers at  2.68

     coppers HMS Ariadne (20) (1776)  3.19

     coppers HMS Aurora (32) (1769)  3.17, 20

     coppers HMS Pegasus (14) (1776)  3.19

     coppers HMS Stag (32) (1769)  3.17, 20

     correspondence with the Admiralty and Navy Board (1712–16)  3.57, 57

     Crowley, Sir Ambrose: supplier of nails and ironwork to  3.61

     Dockyard Regiment (1715)  3.59

     engineering patternmaker apprentices  3.82–3

     established (1568)  3.82fire-extinguishing works  1.25

     Howe (120), HMS (1815), built using Robert Seppings’ diagonal system  1.14

     Kent (74), HMS (1798), rebuilt to Robert Seppings’ principles  1.9

     iron roofs  3.33, 34

     labour force (1712–16)  3.59, 62

     malpractices (1712–16)  3.61

     Master Attendant’s clerk’s pay (1713)  3.62

     Master Shipwright’s clerk’s pay (1713)  3.62

     Master Shipwrights

          Samuel Bentham, see Bentham, Samuel

          William Gray  1.60

          Sir Henry Peake, first assistant master shipwright  1.60

          John Peake, trains there  1.63

          Robert Seppings, see Seppings, Robert

No. 2 dock (2003)  3.86

     No. 3 slip (2003)  3.85

     nuclear submarine refitting complex (1968)  3.86

     origin (1547)  3.81

     refits HM Submarine Valiant (1970)  3.86

     repayment work (after 1945)  3.82–3

     ropery

          lead yard  1.53

          production  1.53

sawmill constructed of cast iron (1812)  3.31

     sheathes HMS Marlborough (74) with lead (1768)  3.18

     sheathes HMS Marlborough (74) with wood (1770)  3.21

     ship construction (1712–16)  3.61

     ships in Ordinary copper-fastened and re-coppered (1786)  3.26

     shoaling of the Medway  3.85, 86

     smithery (1712–16)  3.61

     Storekeeper’s clerks’ pay (1713)  3.62

     suppliers of materials to  3.61

     workforce

          1824  3.76

          1939–45  3.86

          1984  3.86

     Wood Mill erected (1813)  1.25

Chatham Maritime  3.34

Chesapeake, Battle of (1781)  2.49–50, 51, 3.24

chestnut: for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

Chichester, Rear Admiral Sir Edward  2.70

Christ Church, Oxford  1.97

Christian, Admiral Sir Hugh  1.40, 42

chronometers: Harrison’s H4 chronometer trialled by HMS Tartar (1763)  3.15

Clark, Celia, ‘Vintage Ports. Lessons in the Renewal of Historic Naval Dockyards: An International Perspective’  3.89–102

Civil Architect and Engineer of the Navy

     new name for Inspector General of Naval Works (1807)  1.21

     post abolished (1812)  1.21

Civil List Act (1831)  3.79

Clayton, Colonel Jasper: Lieutenant Governor of Gibraltar  2.34

Clement V, Pope  3.67

Clerk, Sir George (FRS): Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

clerks, at Gibraltar victualling yard  2.60

Clevland, John, Secretary of the Admiralty  3.12

Clydebank  3.38

coaks, manufacture of  1.57, 78

Coalbrookdale  3.54

Coats, Ann

      ‘Rosia Water Tanks, Gibraltar’  2.81–7

      ‘The Block Mills: new labour practices for new machines?’  1.59–84

Cock, Randolph, ‘At war with the worm: the Royal Navy’s fight against the shipworm and the barnacle, 1708–1793’  3.9–30

Cockburn, Admiral Sir George (FRS)

     Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

     praises the partial application of Robert Seppings’ system to HMS Northumberland (74)  1.16

     Second Naval Lord (1820)  3.78

coffer dam at Portsmouth Dockyard, introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.27

Coffin, Rear Admiral Sir Isaac

     career  1.84

     enquires about the cost of re-manufacturing copper  1.76

     visits the Block Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard with Nelson  1.82

Cokburn, George, Comptroller of the Navy, and copper sheathing  3.12

Colchester (50), HMS (1721): siege of Gibraltar (1727)  2.34, 35

Colchester (50), HMS (1746): convoys Indiamen (1757)  1.100

Collingwood, HMS (1908): build time  3.49n19

Collins, Mr, of the Victualling Office, Portsmouth  1.93

Collins, Grenville  2.23

Collins, William, copper supplier (1780s)  3.20

Colomb (or Coulomb), François the Elder, master shipwright  3.72

Colombo: dockyard proposed (1942)  2.78

Colossus (74), HMS (1803)

     after Trafalgar (1805)  2.83

     sheathed with recycled copper from the Metal Mills  1.75

Colquhoun, Patrick, ‘Treatise on the Police of the Metropolis’  1.69

Comino: ceded to the Knights of St John  3.70

Commission of Naval Enquiry  1.60, 74

Commission of Revision (Commission for Revising and Digesting the Civil Affairs of His Majesty’s Navy)  1.59, 65, 74, 75

Commission on Fees  1.43, 59

Committee on the Copper Trade  1.76

Committee on Designs  3.37

Commonwealth, HMS (1903): build time  3.49n19

cone clutch  1.88

Congo (12), HMS (1816), paddle-wheeler

     Boulton and Watt steam engine  1.17

     designed by Robert Seppings, for exploration of the Congo River  1.17

Congo River, exploration of  1.17

Conqueror (74), HMS (1801)

     fitting out, inventory of tasks completed in Plymouth by Joseph Tucker  1.33

     present at Trafalgar  1.32

     wages expended on repair (£303 3s 9d)  1.32

Constable, Mr, composition against the shipworm  3.19

Controllers of the Navy: see Martin, Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Byam; Thompson, Captain Sir Thomas Boulden

Cook, Captain James  3.15

cooks, in ships in Ordinary (1714)  3.62

Cooper, Mr, assistant constructor (1905–6)  3.41

coopers, at Gibraltar victualling yard  2.60, 61

Copley Gold Medal of the Royal Society: awarded to Robert Seppings (1818)  1.16

copper, used against shipworm

     bolts

     cold-rolled adopted (1783)  3.26

     copper used in royal dockyards only  3.20

     cost of (1783)  3.26

     dimensions of  3.20

     replace iron bolts  3.17, 25–6

     used in frigates and sloops of 28 guns or fewer (1777)  3.20

     used in larger ships (1778)  3.21

     for sheathing ships  3.9

               Alarm, HMS  3.13

          Amazon, HMS  1.74–5

          Ariadne, HMS  3.19

          Byron’s report on the Dolphin’s condition (1765)  3.15

          Colossus, HMS  1.75

          coppering programme (1776–77)  3.19

          coppering programme (1777)  3.20

          coppering programme paused (1783)  3.25

          coppering programme resumed (1786)  3.26

          Cormorant, HMS  3.19

          cost of  1.76, 78, 3.29n143

          Daphne, HMS  3.19

          dimensions of copper plates  3.28n40

          electrolytic effect of iron nails described  3.14

          fitted in the false keel  3.10, 15

          fully coppered hulls proposed (1761)  3.12

          Galatea, HMS  3.19

          Hawke, HMS  3.19

          Hibernia, HMS  1.74

          Invincible, HMS  3.10

          maintained by the ship’s carpenter  3.28n38

          merchant vessels  3.23

          Metal Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard re-process  1.25, 51, 53

          Navy Board assessments  3.10–11

          Norfolk, HMS  3.12

          at overseas dockyards  3.28n75

          Panther, HMS  3.12

          Pegasus, HMS  3.19

          Perseus, HMS  3.19

          Piet Heyn and  3.10

          ‘prepared paper’ and  3.21

          prevents fouling by dissolving in seawater  3.13

          rudder braces and pintles  3.15, 16

          smelting furnaces at royal dockyards for re-processing  1.25

          speed of coppered ships  3.22, 23

          Swift, HMS  3.19

          Unicorn, HMS  3.19

          see also French navy; Spanish navy

     furnaces converted to sheathing plates at Deptford and Portsmouth (1768–70)  3.20

     gates of the great basin at Portsmouth Dockyard  3.10

     nails introduced (1759)  3.12

     prevents marine growth  3.22

copper trade, control of supply and prices  1.76–77

Corbin, Ambrose, shipwright  1.104

cordite charges, at Jutland  3.44

Cordon-Cadence, Luis Lopez  2.75

Córdova y Córdova, Admiral Luis de  2.52, 53

Cormorant (14), HMS (1776): coppered at Deptford (1776)  3.19

Cornwall, Rear Admiral Charles: commands Sallee squadron  2.12, 13, 15

Cornwall, Admiral Wolfran  2.28

Cornwallis, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

corso (licensed piracy)  3.68

Cort, Henry, ironmaster  1.72, 3.51–6

       bankrupt  3.554

       navy agent  3.51

       patents grooved rollers (1783)  3.53

       patents the puddling process (1784)  3.53

       uses blast furnaces  3.53

       works  3.51, 52, 52, 53, 54, 55

cotton: for sails  3.68, 72

covered docks and slips

     Navy Board recommends covering docks and slipways extensively  1.26

     Samuel Bentham views the covered docks in Karlscrona, Sweden (1807)  1.26

     Samuel Bentham’s plans for Chatham Dockyard’s number one slipway (1811/1812)  1.26

Cox, William, shipwright  1.104

Cranage, Thomas and George  3.54

Craycraft, John, boatswain of HMS Gloucester  3.59

Crease, Commander T. E.  3.49n6

Crete

     arsenal  3.69

     locator map  3.69

Crillon, Louis, Duc de  2.42

Croker, John Wilson, First Secretary of the Admiralty

     agent for Robert Seppings’ knighthood (1819)  1.17

     member of the Council of the Royal Society  1.15

     proposes Robert Seppings to the Royal Society  1.16

Cromwell, Oliver  2.10, 19

Crowley, Sir Ambrose: supplier of nails and ironwork to Chatham Dockyard  3.61

Crown (74), HMS (1782), copper inspected (1786)  3.26

Crown merchantman  2.23

Crozon Peninsula  3.90

Cruiser (6), HMS (1721)  2.34

Cruttenden (East India Company ship): repaired in Portsmouth Dockyard (April 1770)  1.100

Crystal Palace  3.31, 34

Cuba  2.9

Cuddemore, William, victualler and pub landlord  1.104

Culatto, Lionel  2.83, 84, 86

Curtis, Captain Sir Roger  2.39, 41

     Franco-Spanish attack on Gibraltar (1782)  2.42

Cutforth, James: agent victualler  2.59, 60

Cyprus, naval arsenal of the Knights of St John  3.66

       galleys  3.66–7

       Limassol  3.66

       locator map  3.69

       transport vessels  3.66

D

da Vinci, Leonardo  1.88, 90, 92

Dallias, Fra, Prior of Toulouse  3.71

Damerum, Thomas, shipwright  1.104

Danish Asiatic Company, uses Portsmouth Dockyard for repairs

     Johanna and Maria (May 1787)  1.101

     Providentia (1785)  1.101

Danish navy, coppering programme (18th c.)  3.23

Dante Alighieri  3.69

Daphne (20), HMS (1776), coppered at Woolwich (1775)  3.19

Darby, Abraham  3.54

Darby, Vice Admiral George  2.44

     commands Western Squadron  2.50

     at Cork (1781)  2.51–2

     relieves Gibraltar (1781)  2.17, 39, 47, 48, 49, 51, 53

Darch, Thomas

     career  1.84n

     First Clerk at the Admiralty Naval Works Department  1.74

Darwin: operational repair base proposed (1942)  2.78

Davies, J. David: ‘Gibraltar in Naval Strategy c. 1600–1783’  2.8–18

Davis, Joseph, Clerk of the Cheque at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.104

Davis, Samuel, and copper sheathing  3.10–11

Davis, Thomas, and copper sheathing  3.10–11

Davy, Humphry

     electricity based protection systems for copper sheathing a failure  1.18

     President of the Royal Society  1.18

Dawson, James, and ‘prepared paper’  3.21

Dawson, Peter, ‘Admiralty and Navy Board Letters to Chatham Officers 1712–1716’  3.57–63

de Castries, Charles, Minister of the Marine  2.50–51

de Grasse, Admiral François

     commands fleet in Brest (1781)  2.49

     on coppered ships  3.23

     sails for the West Indies (1781)  2.50

de Lucca, Denis  3.70

de Repalda, Don Lorenzo, Governor of Gibraltar  2.27

de Wignacourt, Adrien  3.71

debt, as indication of personal irresponsibility  3.77

Defence – Outline of Future Policy (1957)  3.83

Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act (1990)  3.93

Defensible Barracks, Pembroke: cast-iron construction  3.32, 33

Delcour, Peter, second clerk in the Timber Master’s office, Woolwich (1819)  3.78

Den Helder  3.89

Denis, Vice Admiral Sir Peter: commands Sallee squadron  2.13

Denston, Stokeham  1.105

d’Estaing, Admiral Charles Hector, Comte, see Estaing, Admiral Charles Hector, Comte d’

Department of Defense (DOD) Authorization Act (1994)  3.93

Deptford: as Admiralty borough (after 1832)  3.79

Deptford Royal Dockyard

       ballast-heaving engine, Simon Goodrich’s plans for  1.67

       copper furnaces converted to sheathing plates (1768–70)  3.20

       coppers the Swallow packet (1778)  3.24

       coppers HMS Tamar (16) (1764)  3.15

       coppers HMS Tartar (28) (1763)  3.15

       coppers the Thynne packet (1775)  3.24

       Mr Bertaud’s composition for preserving ships’ bottoms  3.13

       steam-driven circular saws for cutting staves for casks, proposed by Samuel Bentham (1807)  1.45n

       workforce (1824)  3.76

Deptford Victualling Office

     horse wheel pump for  1.67

     single system with Portsmouth and Plymouth  1.37, 45n

Derflinger, SMS, at Jutland  3.44

Devonport Dockyard  2.66, 69

Diana transport (1800)  2.61

Diaper, John  1.104

Diddams, Nicholas, Master Shipwright at Portsmouth Dockyard: builds Block Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard with Sir Henry Peake  1.64

Dixon, Thomas, joiner at Chatham Dockyard  3.62

Dockyard Mobile Squad, Gibraltar

     created (1941)  2.75

     disbanded (1943)  2.77

     at Freetown, Sierra Leone  2.77

     at Gibraltar (1942–43)  2.76–7

     recruitment from home yard workers  2.75–6

Dogger Bank, Battle of (1915)  3.44

Dolphin (28), HMS (1751)

       condition in the Straits of Magellan (1765)  3.15

       copper rudder braces and pintles fitted  3.15, 16, 30n188

       coppered for the Pacific (1764)  3.15

       re-coppered (1766)  3.16

       re-coppered at Deptford (1770)  3.17, 20

       surveyed at Deptford after her circumnavigation (1766)  3.15, 16

       surveyed at Deptford (1768)  3.17

Domett, Admiral Sir William, Lord of the Admiralty: supporter of Robert Seppings  1.14

Dominion, HMS (1903): build time  3.49n19

Doncaster transport (1800)  2.62

Douty, Obedience, spinster  1.104

draughtsmen (1906)  3.40

Dreadnought, HMS (1906)  3.37–50

       bows  3.42

       construction  3.38–41, 49n18

       control tops  3.42, 43

       displacement and speed  3.42

       fighting efficiency  3.43

       fire control system  3.43, 45

       fitting out  3.41–2, 49n18

       galley  3.42–3

       guns  3.41–3

       keel-laying (1905)  3.39

       launch  3.39, 40, 41

       laying off in the mould loft  3.40–1

       leaves Portsmouth  3.42

       named  3.39, 41

       propellers  3.42

       range finder  3.45

       West Indian cruise  3.42, 45,46

Dreadnought, HM Submarine (1960): built by Vickers  3.85

dredgers, steam bucket ladder, designed by Samuel Bentham  1.28, 52

Dreyer, Captain Frederick C.  3.45

       additional gunnery adviser in HMS Dreadnought  3.46

       Admiralty favours his system  3.47, 48

       Fire Control Table  3.45, 46, 50n42, 50n55

       flag captain in HMS Iron Duke  3.48

       gunnery lieutenant in HMS Exeter  3.46

Drinkwater, Captain John  2.39

     on the scarcity of supplies (1781)  2.48

     on Spanish strength (1781)  2.48

Duff, Vice Admiral Robert: commands squadron at Gibraltar  2.37

Duke of Palma: visits Portsmouth Dockyard (1800)  1.93

Dumaresq tables  3.43

Dummer, Edward  1.60

Duncan, Henry: Deputy Controller  1.64

Duncan, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

Dundas, Henry: and Bentham’s steam-driven woodworking machinery  1.24

Dundas, Robert Saunders, see Melville, Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount

Dunsterville, Bartholemew, of Plymouth, block contractors  1.62

Dunsterville, Thomas: fellow shipwright apprentice at Chatham with Samuel Bentham  1.60

Dunsterville, William, of Plymouth, block contractors  1.60

Durban

     dockyard  2.74

     operational repair base proposed (1942)  2.78

Dursley Galley (20), HMS (1719)  2.34, 35

Durston, Engineer Rear-Admiral Sir John, Engineering Chief of the Fleet  3.48n3

Dutch East India Company

     agent (from 1749) George Huish  1.102

     Batavia-bound ships visiting Portsmouth  1.(1759–1795)  1.102

     deserters find refuge in Portsmouth  1.103

     Voorland stays in dock in Portsmouth for repair for 65 days  1.102

E

Eagleton, Edward  1.103

East India Company

       Belvidere launched at Itchenor (April 1787)  1.93

       coppering programme  3.23–4

       Cruttenden repaired in Portsmouth Dockyard (April 1770)  1.100

       Cuvera, see Malabar

       Hartwell launched at Itchenor (May 1787)  1.93

       Malabar (56), HMS, built by, to Robert Seppings’ system (1798)  1.16

       Portsmouth Dockyard handles the bulk of repair work  1.100

       relationship with the Royal Navy  1.00

       Speaker repaired in Portsmouth Dockyard (March 1772)  1.100

       storage and repair facilities in the Camber (by 1760)  1.100–101

Eastern Beach, Gibraltar  2.83

Edgcumbe, Commodore George: commands Sallee squadron  2.13

Edward, Prince, Duke of Kent: Governor of Gibraltar (1802–20)  2.83

Edward VII, King  3.38, 43

Edye, John (FRS): Chief Constructor  1.18

Egmont, John Percival, 2nd Earl of, First Lord of the Admiralty: and copper sheathing for ships  3.15

Egmont (74), HMS (1768): lead sheathing cancelled  3.18

Elba: bread ovens supply the British fleet (1800–01)  2.63

electrolysis, effect of iron nails and bolts on copper sheathing described  3.14, 15, 18

       in the Alarm (1766)  3.16

       in the Dolphin (1766)  3.16

       and mixed metal  3.20

       prevented by flannel and canvas  3.15, 16

       prevented by ‘prepared paper’  3.21

Elfi Bey, the ‘Mameluke Chief’: tours Portsmouth Dockyard (1803)  1.93

Elliot, Hon. William, Admiralty Commissioner  1.60

Elliott, Lieutenant General William Augustus: Governor of Gibraltar  2.37, 38, 41, 43

     career  1.85n

Elliot Brothers  3.45, 48

elm: for ship furnishings (14th c.)  3.68

Elphinstone, Keith (of Elliot Brothers)  3.45, 48

embezzlement from Portsmouth Dockyard (1774–1780)  1.98–99

Endeavour (6), HMS (1768): uncoppered bottom needs careening  3.15

England, attempted Franco-Spanish invasion of  2.16–17

English Harbour, Antigua: water collection at  2.84

Enterprise (28), HMS (1774)  2.39, 41

Erin, HMS  2.75

Escola Naval, Lisbon  3.89

Estaing, Admiral Charles Hector, Comte d’

     commands Brest fleet (1781)  2.50–51

     commands Toulon squadron (1778)  2.16

Europa (50), HMS (1783): built at Woolwich with copper bolts and sheathing (1778)  3.21

Europa Point, Gibraltar  2.83

Eurydice (24), HMS (1781): fitted with mixed-metal parts (1777)  3.20

Euston Station: iron train-shed roof  3.33

Evershed bearing indicators  3.43

Excellent, HMS (gunnery school)  3.44

Exeter (64), HMS (1763): condemned (1783)  3.24, 25

Exeter, HMS (r. HMS Exmouth): battle practice (1904–06)  3.46

Exmouth, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

Experiment (50), HMS (1774), coppered using ‘prepared paper’ at Portsmouth (1779)  3.21

F

Fairfield Shipbuilding Company  3.48n3, 49n19

Fanny transport (1800)  2.62

Faro: careening at  2.12

Ferret (10), HMS (1711)  2.13

Fides transport (1801)  2.61

Figueras, Martin  2.86

fir: for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

fire insurance  1.104, 105

Fisher, Henry Jr., baker  1.104

Fisher, John, First Sea Lord  3.37

       armoured cruiser concept  3.38

       CinC Portsmouth (1906)  3.37

       considers battleships obsolete  3.38

       National Necessities  3.38

       naval superiority over Germany  3.43

       and Pollen’s fire-control system  3.46

       prime ministerial inquiry (1909)  3.47

Fisher, Roger, and ‘prepared paper’  3.21

fitting and storing naval vessels within the boundary of a dockyard

       deepening and enlarging the basin  1.26

       halving the length of the existing double dock  1.26

       using caissons or floating dams to serve as gates  1.26, 51

       using pumps with moveable steam engines to control the water level in docks  1.26

Fitzherbert, Thomas (1746–1822), merchant in Portsmouth

becomes Arundel’s MP with Lord Sandwich’s backing (1780)  1.95

leases Stubbington Manor on Portsea Island  1.95

supplies horses to Portsmouth Dockyard  1.95

flannel, used to prevent electrolysis under copper sheathing  3.15, 16

flax: for rope and caulking (14th c.)  3.68

fleet reviews in Portsmouth (1773 and 1778)  1.98

Flint, copper rolling mills  3.23

floating docks  2.73

Flora transport (1801)  2.61

Florry, Mr, proposes iron plated with lead for preserving ships’ bottoms (1772)  3.18

food, naval: sailors’ complaints in HMS Namur (90) (January 1758)  1.99

Forbes, Captain George, Baron  2.36

Forbes, William, copper supplier (1770s and 80s)  3.20, 26, 29n109, 29n183

Ford, Richard, agent victualler  2.56

     opens a victualling yard at Palermo (1805–08)  2.63

     uses Madalena Islands as a rendezvous (1803–05)  2.63

Formidable, HMS (1898): build time  3.49n19

Fort Saint Angelo, Malta

     location map  3.67

     strengthened by the Knights of St John  3.70

Fortune (16), HMS (1780)  2.43

Fowler, Thomas  2.27

Fox, Sir Charles  3.33

Fox, Henry Edward  2.83

Fox Henderson & Co.

      build Crystal Palace and Paddington Station  3.34

      design the Captain Superintendent’s office at Pembroke Dockyard  3.33

      re-formed (1841)  3.33

Frankland, Thomas, Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

Freetown, Sierra Leone

      floating dock and crane  2.77

      Mobile Dockyard Squad  2.77

      naval dry dock  2.66

French navy

      blockaded at Brest, using Torbay as anchorage (from 1798)  1.41

      coppering programme  3.22–3, 28n38

Fresnell (or Fresnel), Desire  3.59

Frett, Edward  1.104

Froude, R. E., Superintendent of Admiralty Experimental Works  3.42, 48n3

Fulk, King of Jerusalem  3.73 n2

Funtley, Hants: ironworks at  3.51, 52

Furious, HMS (1896): 18in guns  3.43

G

Galatea (20), HMS (1776): coppered at Deptford (1775)  3.19

Galley Creek see Porto del Galere, Malta

galleys (Knights of St John)  3.67–8

galvanic action of iron nails on copper sheathing  3.14

Ganges (East India Company ship): lent to the Royal Navy as a transport (1780)  1.101

Gard, W. H., Chief Constructor of Portsmouth Dockyard  3.37, 48n3

Garden Island naval base  2.78

Garthshore, William  1.60

career  1.85

Gauden, Jonathan

English agent at Gibraltar (1686–90)  2.11, 12

storekeeper and muster master at Gibraltar (1684–90)  2.27, 28

Geddes, James  2.59

Genoa: corsairs  3.67

George III, King of Great Britain

      approves the Royal Nay’s coppering programme (1779)  3.22

      intimate of Sir Joseph Banks  1.12

George Baker & Sons  3.34

Gibraltar, English then British base at (from 1686)

       abandoned (1735–37)  2.14

       advantages of  2.19, 23, 24

       agent at  2.11

       arsenal (1905–06)  2.68

       barracks  2.37

       breakwater proposed (1759)  2.37

       Buena Vista Barracks  2.83

       captured by England (1704)  2.7, 9, 11, 19

       careening at  2.10

             fourth and fifth rate ships  2.12

            Gloucester hulk  2.24

            in the siege of 1727  2.34, 35

       casemates  2.37

       coaling station  2.66, 68

       convict colony (to 1875)  2.68

       Cumberland Buildings  2.76

       deficiencies of  2.12, 14, 24–5

       dockyard

            construction of  2.68

            closure (1958)  3.84

            dry docks

                  1905–06  2.67–68, 68, 69

                  1941  2.74

      established (1894)  2.65

      Dockyard Mobile Squad  2.7, 75–6

      Europa Point

            affordable housing  2.82

            battery  2.41

            proposed new barracks (1725)  2.32

      for the Mediterranean fleet

            1680  2.22, 23, 24

            1739  2.14

       for the Sallee squadron  2.7, 11, 12

       forge built (1680/1)  2.25

       garrison hospital  2.32, 34

       Grand Arsenal  2.81

       hutments (1940)  2.75, 76

       hospital (1746)  2.15, 31, 37

       Jewish community  2.32

       King’s Bastion  2.37, 42

       maps of  2.10, 33, 40, 75

       mast house and pond (1756)  2.15

       naval commissioner appointed (1756)  2.15

       naval garrison (1905–06)  2.68

       naval hospital (1905–06)  2.68, 81

       New Mole at

            boom for (1780)  2.39

            extended (19th century)  2.67, 68, 69, 70,

            floating batteries  2.41

       Spanish fireship attack (1780)  2.38–9

      Old Mole at

             bastion proposed (1759)  2.37

             battery erected (1727)  2.35, 36

             built by Spain (1615–70)  2.10

             described by Samuel Atkins (1682)  2.23

             permission to use granted to France (1687)  2.27

             surveyed (1680)  2.22

       Parson’s (Lodge) Battery  2.81, 83

       Prince’s Lines  2.37

       proposed capture by England (1656)  2.10

       Ragged Staff, wells at  2.84

       Rosia Water Tanks, see Rosia Water Tanks

       Royal Yacht Squadron  2.67

       sieges of

             Franco-Spanish (1704–05)  2.11, 31

            Great Siege (1779–83)  2.7, 9, 16, 31

            map  2.40

            Franco-Spanish attack (1782)  2.42

            scarcity of food and supplies  2.48

            siege of 1726–27  2.7, 34–7

                  British casualties  2.36

      Spanish crown property  2.7, 24

      stores and storehouses  2.44

             Algerine prizes used for (1681)  2.27

             Spanish bombardment (1780–81)  2.41

             store sheds built (after 1727)  2.37

             storehouses built by Gauden (1686)  2.27

             storehouses built by Herbert (1680/1)  2.25

             storehouses built on the New Mole (1720s)  2.31, 38

             storehouses completed (1746)  2.12

             Unity tender (1727)  2.35

             victualling stores (1813)  2.58–9, 81

             Waterport  2.57

             White Convent  2.57

      strategic role  2.12,31, 53

      supplies for  2.32

      topography and natural defences  2.32

      trade at  2.24,66

      victualling agents, see agents victualler

      victualling wharf

            built (1736)  2.12

            inadequate after the loss of Minorca (1756)  2.15–16

      victualling yard (1812)  2.57, 86

            cholera epidemic (1804)  2.59

            coal store, fire in (1807) 59

            pay at  2.61

            purpose and function  2.64

            staff at  2.60

      water supply at  2.57, 84, 85, see also Rosia Water Tanks

      Waterportvictualling storehouse  2.57

      White Convent victualling storehouse  2.57

      Willis’s Battery  2.35, 36, 37, 38, 42, 43

      workers in

            Gibraltarian  2.74

            Spanish  2.69, 74–5

Gibraltar, Straits of  2.10, 15

Gibraltar Royal Dockyard, see Gibraltar, English then British base at

Gibson, Captain John  2.41

Gilbert, K. R.: definitive work on block-making machinery  1.85

Gillingham (or Jillyngham) Water  3.81

Girlington, Captain Richard Thomas: leaves of absence (1713–14)  3.59

Glen Rocky Distillery  2.85

Glorieux (74) HMS (1756 as Fr. Glorieux): lost in a hurricane (1782)  3.24

Gloucester, HMS

      careening hulk at Gibraltar (1680)  2.24

      careening hulk at Tangier (1680)  2.21–2

Godfrey, Sir Edmondberry  2.23

Godolphin, Francis: English ambassador to Spain  2.27

Godolphin, Sidney, 1st Earl  2.9

Goliath (74), HMS (1781): copper inspected (1786)  3.26

Gonzales, Juan  2.61

Gooden, John, quarterman  1.105

Goodrich, Simon, mechanist, Admiralty and Navy Board employee

      attends Arbitration Court (1810)  1.65

      Bentham’s deputy (1805–1807)  1.65

      Brunel is leading light for  1.85

      in customized research teams with Watt, Wedgwood etc.  1.65

      as Deputy Inspector of Naval Works at Portsmouth, visits Cort’s works (1806)  3.55

      describes how politics are affecting the future of the Block Mills (1806)  1.75

      draughtsman to Samuel Reke then succeeds him (in 1799)  1.67

      early life and family history  1.64

      engineer and mechanist to the Navy Board  1.(1814)  1.79

      makes plans, estimates and supervises great variety of projects outside the Block Mills  1.67

      marries Susanna Lloyd  1.64

      mechanist to the Navy Board (1799)  1.65

      moves to Portsmouth (1814)  1.79

      moves to Portugal (1834)  1.80

      papers in the Science Museum Library  1.63

      position at the Navy Board abolished (December 1812)  1.79

      prime mover in the industrialization of the dockyards (1812–1831)  1.80

      reports on the merits of Robert Seppings’ repair of the Justitia (1817)  1.16

      runs the Block Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.65

      services listed by Samuel Reke (1806)  1.65

      Society of Arts prizes  1.65

      transferred to Navy Board (October 1807)  1.65

      wide-ranging interests  1.65

      works in the Inspector General’s department (1800)  1.21

Goodricke, Sir Henry: English ambassador to Spain  2.24

Goodwin, Peter, ‘Preparing HMS Victory and the ships for Trafalgar’  1.31–34

Gower, Captain Leveson  1.100

Gozo: ceded to the Knights of St John  3.70

Gracie, Alexander  3.48n3

Graham, Sir James: First Lord of the Admiralty (1830)  1.80, 81, 3.76

Graham Greene, W.  3.38

Grand Harbour, Malta: location map  3.67

Grand Storehouse, Portsmouth: paid for by the Victualling Board  1.37

Grantham, Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron  2.9

Graves, Admiral Thomas: Battle of the Chesapeake  2.49–50, 3.24

Gray, William, Master Shipwright at Chatham Dockyard: trains Samuel Bentham  1.60

Great Britain: Mediterranean strategy (1600–1783)  2.9, 11, 12, 13, 17

Green, Colonel William  2.37

Green Row Rooms, Portsmouth  1.104

Greenock  2.76

Greenway, John  1.105

Greenwich: as Admiralty borough (after 1832)  3.79

Grenville, Thomas: First Lord of the Admiralty (1806)  1.74

Grey, Charles: First Lord of the Admiralty (1806)  1.74

Grimshaw, John: Sunderland ropemaker  1.75, 78

Gun Wharf, Portsmouth  1.37

gunnery, naval

      salvo firing  3.50n39

guns, naval

      cast-iron manufacture  3.53

      Fisher’s policy  3.43

      Dreadnought shell allowance  3.49n31

      Vickers Mark X  3.41

Guerrier (ex-Guerrière) storage ship (1800)  2.62, 63

H

Haddock, Admiral Nicholas: commands Mediterranean fleet (1738)  2.14

Haijo, HMS  2.75

Hall, Basil: Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

Hall, Edward  1.96

Halls, Dartford  3.82

Hamilton, Major-General (1799)  1.62

Hamilton, Lord George, First Civil Lord

      appoints Topham, Jones and Railton to extend the Gibraltar mole  2.68

      argues for a dock at Gibraltar  2.66, 71

Hamond, Captain Sir Andrew Snape  1.68

Hansen, Paulus  1.102

Hants, Sussex, and Dorset Fire Insurance  1.93, 104

Happy Return merchantman  2.27

Harding, James  1.103

Harding, Richard, ‘Gibraltar: a tale of two sieges 1726–7 and 1779–1783’  2.31–45

Hardy, Sir Charles  2.17

Harland and Wolff, Belfast  3.38

Harrison, John: H4 chronometer trialled by HMS Tartar (1763)  3.15

Harrison, Steven  2.85

Hartwell (East India Company ship): launched at Itchenor (April 1787)  1.93

Harvey, Captain Augustus  2.12, 15, 38, 39

Haslar Hospital: Simon Goodrich suggests improvements  1.67

Hat in Hand pub, Portsmouth  1.104

Havana harbour: repairs HMS Alarm (1762)  3.13

Hawk (6), HMS (1721)  2.34

Hawke, Admiral Edward

      commands Mediterranean fleet  2.16

      on the limitations of Gibraltar (1756)  2.12

Hawke (East India Company ship)  1.100

Hawke (8), HMS (1756)

      coppered at Deptford (1769)  3.17

      examined at Sheerness (1775)  3.19

      sheathed with wood  3.28n99

Hawkins, Sir John: and sheathing against shipworm  3.10

Hay, Robert, Private Secretary to Lord Melville, Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

Haydn, Franz Joseph: turned away from visiting Portsmouth Dockyard (1794)  1.93–94

heaters-up (1906)  3.39

Heatley, David

      agent victualler at Lisbon  2.56

      victualler to the fleet  2.63

heavy repair ships  2.73

hemp  3.72

Henderson, Commander W.  3.48n3

Henley & Sons  2.59

Henry II, King of Cyprus  3.67

Henslow, Sir John: Surveyor of the Navy (1784–1806)  1.63, 64

      and coppering ships  3.26

Herbert, Admiral Arthur  2.10, 11, 20

      builds a forge and storehouse at Gibraltar (1680/1)  2.25

      considers Cadiz as a base for the Mediterranean fleet  2.22

      judges Gibraltar the finest port (1680)  2.23

      Mediterranean experience  2.23

      protégés  2.11

      uses Gibraltar not Tangiers as a base for the Mediterranean fleet  2.22, 25

Hewer, William  2.27

Hewitt, James  1.99

Heyn, Admiral Piet: and copper sheathing against shipworm  3.10

Hibernia (110), HMS (1804), recycled copper analysed (1806)  1.74

Hibernia, HMS (1905): build time  3.49n19

Hills, Thomas: Master Sailmaker  1.96

Hillsborough, Wills Hill, Earl of  2.39

Hindenberg, SMS: at Jutland  3.45

Hindustan, HMS (1903): build time  3.49n19

HM Customs: offices at Pembroke Dockyard  3.32

Hobart: operational repair base proposed (1942)  2.78

Holden, Peter  3.32

holders-up (1906)  3.39

Holl, Edward, architect and engineer, Surveyor of Buildings

      delineates responsibilities with Samuel Goodrich  1.68

      designs Block Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard with Samuel Bunce  1.64

      floor construction in iron buildings  3.31, 32, 32

      and structural ironwork  3.31–6

Holmen  3.90

Holmes, Thomas, coal merchant  1.104

Hong Kong Dockyard  2.66, 67, 69

      Chinese labour force at (1941)  2.77–8

      disposal proposed (1957)  3.83

Hood, Samuel, Commissioner of Portsmouth Dockyard  1.98

Hood, Rear Admiral Samuel

      at the Chesapeake  2.50

      and coppered ships  3.23

      in the West Indies  2.49, 53

Hopson, Admiral Edward  2.13, 34

      on the limitations of Gibraltar (1727)  2.12

      ordered to the West Indies  2.34

Horsborough, Captain James (EIC): hydrographer  1.17

horses

      cement mill at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.28

      Deptford Victualling Office  1.67

      mortar mill at Woolwich Dockyard  1.67

      raise water at the Portsmouth brewhouses  1.45n

      supplied to Portsmouth Dockyard by Thomas Fitzherbert  1.95

Hosier, Vice Admiral Francis: second in command in the West Indies  2.34

Howard, Sir Philip: and ‘Mill’d lead’ sheathing  3.10

Howe, Admiral Richard, 1st Earl, First Lord of the Admiralty  2.44

      and copper sheathing  3.26

      defeats the Toulon squadron off Sandy Hook  2.16

      relieves Gibraltar (1782)  2.17, 42

      returns to Portsmouth (1794)  1.93

      sailors’ mutiny in Portsmouth (1794)  1.99

Howe (120), HMS (1815)

      built at Chatham Dockyard using Robert Seppings’ diagonal system (1815)  1.14

      comparison with HMS St Vincent and HMS Nelson  1.15, 16

Howick, Lord see Grey, Lord

Huddart, Joseph (EIC): and the presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.11

Hunt, Mr, his composition against shipworm  3.19

Hunt, Edward, Surveyor of the Navy  1.105, 3.26

Hunt, Thomas  1.104

Huntington, Lt (? of marines), of HMS Canterbury  3.59

Huish, George

      consul of the Dutch government  1.102

      Dutch East India Company agent (from 1749)  1.102

      Honourable East India Company agent  1.100

      town clerk and coroner in Portsmouth  1.98, 102

Hussar (28), HMS (1763): copper sheathing and mixed metal braces and pintles (1777)  3.20

hydraulic riveting tools  3.38

I

Île Longue nuclear submarine base  3.90

Implacable, HMS (1899): build time  3.49n19

Incomparable, HMS (planned 1915)  3.43

Indefatigable, HMS (1909)

      at Jutland  3.44

      wreck found  3.43

Inflexible, HMS (1907): repaired at Gibraltar after Jutland  2.79n

Inglefield, Commissioner John Nicholson  2.57

Inion, William, scavelman and landlord  1.104, 105

Innocent, Pope: Quam Amabilis Deo (bull, 1139–43)  3.66

Inspector General of Naval Works see Office of Naval Works

Intrepid (64), HMS (1770): and Mr Jackson’s liquid against shipworm  3.17

Invincible (74), HMS (1765)

      coppered using ‘prepared paper’ (1779)  3.22

      false keel coppered  3.10

      hull coppered (1772 or 1779)  3.18

Invincible, HMS (1906)  3.37, 43

      construction 38–40

      launch (1906)  3.39, 40

      range finder  3.45

      wreck found  3.43

Iraklion naval yard, Crete  3.69

Irish Ferries: offices at Pembroke Dockyard  3.32

Iron Duke, HMS (1912)  3.41, 48

iron fastenings (1777)  3.20

iron nails, electrolytic effect on copper sheathing  3.14

Ironside, General Sir Edmund: Governor of Gibraltar  2.74–5

Irresistible, HMS (1898): build time  3.49n19

Isabella transport (1801)  2.61

Isherwood, Harold  3.48

J

Jackson, Mr, liquid against shipworm

      Sandwich’s opinion  3.18–19

      to be tried in the Intrepid (1766)  3.18

Jackson, Captain H. B., Controller of the Navy  3.48n3

Jamaica

      British conquest of  2.17

      Royal Navy station  2.49, 53

James, David  3.35

James, William, historian: uses John Knowles’ pamphlet to complete his discussion of Robert Seppings’ system  1.17

James II, King

      and Sallee squadron at Gibraltar  2.11

      and storehouses at Gibraltar  2.28

James Galley, HMS  2.23

Jason (32), HMS (1763)

      coppered at Deptford for a voyage to the Falklands (1765)  3.17

      surveyed at Deptford (1767)  3.17

Jellicoe (or Jellico), Adam, Pay Clerk at Portsmouth Dockyard and ironmaster  1.72, 3.54

Jellicoe, Captain J. R., Director of Naval Ordnance, later Director of the Navy  3.42, 46, 48n3, 49n6

      and Pollen’s fire-control system  3.46

Jennings, Admiral Sir John  2.34, 36

Jerusalem: hospital founded (1070s)  3.65

Jervis, Admiral Sir John see St Vincent, Admiral Sir John Jervis, Earl

Jillyngham (Gillingham) Water  3.81

Johanna and Maria (Danish Asiatic Company ship): repaired at Portsmouth Dockyard (May 1787)  1.101

John Brown, Clydebank  3.38, 49n19

Johnson, Mr W., copper contractor  3.12

Johnstone Hope, Sir William, First Sea Lord  1.17

Jones, Captain Harry, joint Assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence  3.49n6

Jowell, Tessa  2.87

Jupiter (50), HMS (1778): coppered (1778)  3.21

Justitia, ex-Danish battleship: badly distorted and used for a demonstration by Robert Seppings (1817)  1.16

Jutland, Battle of (1916)  3.38, 43, 44

      Dreadnought shell allowance  3.49n31

K

Kane, Colonel Richard, deputy governor of Minorca

      report on Gibraltar’s defences (1725)  2.32–3, 37

Karlscrona, Sweden

      Bentham views the covered docks (1807)  1.26

      Swedish Housing Executive moves to  3.90

Keir (or Kiers), James

      and iron bolts  3.26

      and mixed metal bolts  3.26

Keith, George, ninth Earl Marischal  2.14

Kelvin, William Thompson, 1st Baron  3.46, 48n3

Kempenfelt, Admiral Richard  3.23

Kempthorne, John  2.23

Kennedy, President John. F.  3.85

Kent, Henry  1.101

Kent (70), HMS (1724): siege of Gibraltar, 1727  2.34

Kent (74), HMS (1798)

      deterioration of her hull in two years (1803–1805)  1.9

      rebuilt in Chatham Dockyard to Robert Seppings’ principles, to remain in service for another eighty years  1.9

      sent home by Nelson accompanied by a transport  1.9

Keppel, Augustus

      commodore in command of the Sallee squadron (1749)  2.13

      on coppering ships (1778)  3.20–21, 25

Kerr, David Ramsay, surgeon at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.105

Khan, Mirza Abul Hassan: tours new Block Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard (1810)  1.93

Kilindini: dockyard proposed (1943)  2.78

Killigrew, Sir Henry: commands an English squadron  2.27

King, Dennis  2.83

King, Commodore Sir Richard  3.24

King George V class battleships  3.45

Kingdom, John: chief clerk in the secretary’s office at the Navy Office  1.62

Kingdom, Sophia: marries Brunel  1.62

Kingdom, William: Plymouth Dockyard contractor  1.62

knees: iron substituted for wooden  1.9

Knights Hospitaller of the Order of St John  3.65–74

      capture Rhodes (1309)  3.67

      comptroller of the arsenal  3.68

      corso (licensed piracy)  3.68

      galleys  3.67–8

      grand admiral  3.65

      grand commander of Italy  3.68

      grand commander of Provence  3.68

      grand master  3.68

      langues  3.65

      members  3.65–6

      move to Malta (1530)  3.70

      naval arsenals  3.66–74

      retire to Cyprus (1291)  3.66

      slaves  3.71

      square-rigged ships (18th c.)  3.71, 72

      treasurer  3.68

Knowles, Captain Sir Charles Henry  2.39, 41, 43

      senior naval officer at Gibraltar (1782)  2.42

Knowles, John, Chief Clerk of the Surveyors’ Office

      elected Fellow of the Royal Society (1822)  1.17

      pamphlet The Elements and Practice of Naval Architecture (1822)  1.17

Konver  3.92, 93

Kowloon Dockyard  2.66, 67, 69

Kraai (Dutch East India Company packetboat)  1.102

L

Lady Penrhyn (convict transport ship)  1.101

Lagos: British watering point  2.14, 35

Lagos Bay, battle of  2.16

Lambert, Andrew, ‘Science and seapower: The Navy Board, the Royal Society and the structural reforms of Sir Robert Seppings’  1.9–19

Landsdowne, George Granville, 1st Baron  2.27

Lang, Oliver, pupil of Robert Seppings, shipbuilder: builds Royal Navy steamships at Woolwich  1.17

Langford, William: and copper sheathing  3.10–11

Launceston (40), HMS (1711)  3.60

Law, Vice-Admiral Sir Horace, Controller of the Navy (1968)  3.85

Lawson, Admiral Sir John

      on the advantages of Tangier  2.20

      shelters in Gibraltar bay (1664)  2.23

Le Fevre, Peter, ‘Gibraltar, Tangier and the English Mediterranean Fleet 1680–1690’  2.19–30

lead, for sheathing ships  3.10, 18

Leake, Sir John: Mediterranean experience  2.11

Lee, Mr, Master Caulker at Portsmouth Dockyard  3.10

Leeward Islands station  2.49, 53

Legg’s Demi-Bastion, Portsmouth  1.37

Leghorn: English base against the Barbary regencies  2.11

Lennox (70), HMS  2.34

Lennox-Boyd, Alan, Secretary of State for the Colonies (1957)  3.83

Leocadia (Spanish) (36)  3.23

Leslie, Captain Patrick  2.39

Levant Company  1.97

Liberty transport (1800)  2.62

Lindegren, Andrew  1.98, 104

Lindos  3.68

Linotype  3.45, 46, 48

Linzee, Edward, apothecary in Portsmouth

      assembles substantial property portfolio  1.98

      declines knighthood (1778)  1.98

      eight times mayor  1.98

Lion, HMS (1910): at Jutland  3.44, 50n38

Lisbon

      agent victualler (David Heatley) at  2.56

      careening at  2.12

      Sallee squadron  2.11, 27

      support in the Gibraltar siege of 1727  2.43

      victualling yard at  2.57, 60

Littleton, Captain (later Admiral) James: Commissioner of Chatham Dockyard  3.59

Llanstephan Castle (troopship)  2.76

Lloyd, David  2.23

Lloyd, John, millwright  1.64, 71

Lloyd, Rodney M.: Admiral Superintendent at Malta  2.70

Lloyd, Sarah: marries Simon Goodrich  1.64

Lloyd & Ostell  1.65

Lock, John, Master Shipwright at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.104

loftsmen (1905–6)  3.41, 49n15

London, HMS (1899): build time  3.49n19

Lord Hood transport (1801)  2.61

Lord Nelson transport (1800)  2.62

Lord Nelson, HMS (1906)

      build time  3.49n19

      guns sent to HMS Dreadnought  3.41

Lorient  3.89–90

Louis of Battenberg, Rear-Admiral Prince, Director of Naval Intelligence  3.48n3, 50n55

Lowestoft or Lowestoffe (24), HMS (1742): careens at Faro  2.12

Luffman, Mr, shipwright  1.104

Lurting, Robert  2.25

Lusitania, RMS  3.38

Lyme (20), HMS (1720)  2.34, 35

Lyon pink  2.34

M

Macdonald, Janet, ‘The Victualling Yard at Gibraltar and its role in feeding the Royal Navy in the Mediterranean during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars’  2.55–64

MacDougall, Philip

       ‘Disuniting the Workforce: Intensifying the Dockyard Labour Crisis of 1941’  2.73–9

       ‘The Naval Arsenals of the Knights of St John’ 3.65–74

McKinney Act (1987)  3.93

Macmillan, Harold  3.84, 85

Madalena Islands: British rendezvous (1803–1805)  2.63

Madden, Captain C. E., Naval Assistant to the Controller  3.48n3, 49n6

Mahon, Minorca, see Port Mahon, Minorca

Magellan, Straits of  3.15

Magicienne (French) (32)  3.23

Major transport (1800)  2.61

Malabar (74), HMS (1818): first ship built to Robert Seppings’ system  1.16

Malta

      Arsenal Salvago (or Arsenale d’Italia)  3.71

      Birgu  3.67, 70, 71

      British occupation (1800)  3.72

      Corderia  3.72

      dockyard (1654–85)  3.70–1

      dockyard (RN)  2.73, 3.83

      English base against the Barbary regencies  2.11

      Fort Riccasoli  3.72

      French Creek  3.71

      Great Siege (1565)  3.70

      Knights of St John gain  3.70

      location map  3.67

      Marsamxett Harbour  3.70

      Porto del Galleare  3.70

      regeneration of  3.91

      Royal Engineers’ Barracks, Floriana  3.91

      ropery (British)  3.73

      San Cristoforo bastion  3.70

      San Raphael of Cotonera bastion  3.71, 72

      Santa Barbara bastion  3.70

      Senglea shipbuilding and repair yard  3.71, 72–3

      Sheer Bastion  3.73

      shipbuilding materials required for the Knights of St John  3.72

      victualling yard at Valetta  2.63, 64

Malta Planning Authority  3.91

Man, Vice Admiral Robert: commands Sallee squadron  2.13

Manchester Ship Canal Company  2.68

Mansell, Sir Robert: Algiers expedition (1620)  2.9–10

Mareno, Manuel  2.61

Marigold, HMS: wrecked at Tangier  2.20

Markham, Captain John  1.60

      career  1.82n

Marlborough (74), HMS (1764)

      sheathed with lead at Chatham (1768)  3.18

      sheathed with wood at Chatham (1770)  3.21

Marsden, John  1.75

      career  1.84n

Marsden, William

      Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

      career  1.83n

      on the Commission of Naval Enquiry  1.76

      enquires about the cost of re-manufacturing copper  1.76

      and William Taylor’s blockmaking contract  1.62

Martell, Peter, shipwright  1.105

Martin, Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Byam

      Controller of the Navy Board (1814)  1.15, 16, 18

      recommends Robert Seppings for major financial reward  1.17

Martinique  2.49

Mary Ann transport (1800)  2.61

Mason, Edward, Clerk of the Acts: and copper sheathing  3.12

Matto, Robert  2.84

Maudslay, Henry

      and Marc Isambard Brunel  1.62, 85

      mechanist vs engineer  1.65, 79

      Thames Tunnel  1.65

Maynard, John, English consul at Lisbon: on the advantages of Tangier  2.20

Mayne, Rear Admiral Robert  2.67

Mediterranean fleet

      based at Gibraltar (from 1684)  2.27

      based at Port Mahon  2.14

      cruising stations  2.14, 15, 16

      Nicholas Haddock commands (1738)  2.14

      Edward Hawke commands  2.16

      Henry Medley commands  2.15

      Sir Chaloner Ogle commands  2.15

      Henry Osborn commands  2.16

      William Rowley commands  2.15

Medley, Vice-Admiral Henry

      commands Mediterranean fleet  2.15

      Italian mistress an enemy agent  2.15

Medway (60), HMS (1755), part-coppered (1760)  3.12

Melville, Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount

      favours building a new dockyard at Northfleet  1.14

      First Lord of the Admiralty  1.14

      visits the Metal Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard (1807)  1.76–77

Meon, River  3.52, 52, 55

Meredith, John, Second Clerk of the Cheque at the Victualling Yard, Portsmouth: salary  1.39–40

Merritt, William, shipwright  1.104, 105

Merlin (18), HMS (1757): part-coppered and part-sheathed (1762)  3.13

Metal Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard: see Portsmouth Royal Dockyard

Middleton, Charles, see Barham, Charles Middleton, 1st Baron

military expeditions

      Portsmouth as assembly point  1.40

      West Indies (November 1795) with 18,740 troops in 200 transports  1.40

mill for making roman cement, established by Samuel Bentham at Sheerness Dockyard  1.28

Millbank Prison  2.68

milled lead for sheathing ships  3.10

Miller, Adrianna  3.32, 33

Minerva (32), HMS (1759): copper sheathing and mixed-metal braces and pintles (1777)  3.20

Minorca

      British gain (1708)  2.31

      British loss (1756)  2.9, 15

      British loss (1782)  2.41

      British recovery (1763)  2.16

Minuteman strategic missile  3.85

Mitchell, E. H., Assistant Constructor, RCNC  3.48n3

Mitchell, Thomas, Chief Constructor and Manager of the Portsmouth Constructive Department: knighted  3.41

mixed metal  3.20

Molins, Deptford  3.82

Moltke, SMS: at Jutland  3.44

Monaco, Prince of: tours Portsmouth Dockyard (1768)  1.93

Montagu, Edward, General-at-Sea  2.10, 19

      on the possible capture of Gibraltar (1656)  2.19–20

Montagu, Admiral Sir George  1.42

Montagu, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

Moore, Captain Gordon, Director of Naval Ordnance  3.47–8, 50n40, 50n55

Morley, Thomas  2.21

Morocco, Emperor of  2.37

Morriss, Roger

       ‘The office of the Inspector General of Naval Works and technological innovation in the Royal Dockyards’  1.21–9

       ‘Victims, pariahs and survivors. The shaping of the government workforce 1815–1830’  3.75–80

mortising machine for the shell of pulley blocks, Brunel’s only fully automatic machine  1.87–89

Motley, J. C., insurance agent  1.104

Mountbatten, Lord Louis  3.83

Muckle, Lt George  2.41

Mulgrave, Constantine Phipps, 2nd Baron  2.39

mundic  3.19

Muñoz, Jose Martinez  2.75

Murdoch, William  1.88

mutiny, Portsmouth (1783)  1.99–100

Murray, James  1.99

Muscat, Joseph  3.73n8

Musk naval base  3.90

N

nails

      copper nails introduced for copper sheathing  3.12

      electrolytic effect of iron nails on copper sheathing  3.14

Namur, HMS: sailors’ complaints of poor food (January 1758)  1.99

Napoleon: and Ottoman Empire  2.63

Narbeth, John H., Assistant Director of Naval Construction (1922)  3.40, 42

Narborough, Sir John  2.21

      favours Livorno and Minorca over Tangier  2.22

Narcisus (24) HMS (1781), fitted with mixed-metal parts (1777)  3.20

National Necessities (Fisher)  3.38

Naval Academy, Portsmouth

      William Bayly, Headmaster  1.96

      pupils get drunk in town  1.99

      John Walton, Headmaster  1.98

Naval Dockyards Society: visit to Pembroke Dockyard (2001)  3.32

Naval Defence Act (1889)  2.7, 65, 66, 67

Navy Board

      abolished (1832)  1.18, 80, 3.76

      Barham’s administrative reorganisation  1.59

      brass latten sheathing for ships  3.11

      Controller of  1.15, 3.75

      copper sheathing for ships

            Aurora, Stag, Hawke and Dolphin (1769–70)  3.17, 20

            Charles Parry’s proposal (1708)  3.10–11

            Medway and America (1760)  3.11

            Norfolk and Panther (1759)  3.11

      dockyard workforce (1830–3)  3.75

      independence regarding technical policy  1.14

      Inspector General of Naval Works transferred to (1807)  1.21

      lead sheathing for ships  3.18

      merchant yards not used for shipbuilding after 1815  1.17

      Mr Florry’s iron plates for preventing shipworm  3.18

      Mr Jackson’s composition for preventing shipworm  3.17

      mixed-metal parts (1777)  3.20

      occupation of Malta  3.72–3

      opposes the use of steam engines for fear of deranging established practices  1.23

      private agency abolished (1796)  3.76

      recommends covering docks and slipways extensively  1.26

      relationship with Admiralty  1.9

      report on fastenings in copper-bottomed ships (1783)  3.25

      Robert Williams’ method for preserving ships’ bottoms  3.13

      resistance to change  1.11

      Samuel Bentham moves to (August 1808)  1.79

      storehouses at Gibraltar  2.25, 26

      tar from sea coal for preserving ships’ bottoms  3.13

      wood sheathing for ships: Merlin (1762)  3.13

      see also Surveyors of the Navy

Navy League  2.67

Navy Surveyor, see Surveyors of the Navy

Nelly transport (1801)  2.61

Nelson, Horatio

      body rests in Rosia Bay after Trafalgar  2.83

      desires a station in the East India Company’s service  1.100

      on Lisbon  1.105

      prize agents  2.59

      sends HMS Kent home due to structural problems  1.9

      victualling (1803–1805)  2.63

      visits Block Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.82

Nelson, Richard, secretary to the Navy Board (1796–1820)  3.78

Nelson (120), HMS (1814): comparison with HMS Howe  1.15, 16

Nepean, Evan, Secretary to the Admiralty: resigns because of St Vincent’s Commission for Naval Enquiry  1.60

Network Demilitarised  3.91, 93

New Fire Office Insurance  1.104

New Zealand, HMS (1904): build time  3.49n19

Nicholas, Captain Stuart, joint Assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence  3.49n6

Niger (32), HMS (1759)  2.83

non-recoil gun carriages, Simon Goodrich’s contrivances for  1.67

Nonsuch (or Nonesuch) (64), HMS (1774)  2.23, 24

Norfolk (74), HMS (1757), part-coppered (1759)  3.11, 28n40

Norfolk transport (1800)  2.61

Norris, Admiral Sir John  2.12

      Mediterranean experience  2.28

      squadron operates from Lisbon  2.14

      at Tangier (1680)  2.22

Northfleet, site of proposed new dockyard  1.14

      Lord Melville favours  1.14

      Robert Seppings a candidate to build  1.14

Northumberland (74), HMS (1798): partial application of Robert Seppings’ system  1.16

Nott, John, Defence Secretary (1981)  3.86

O

oak

      for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

      foreign v. British for shipbuilding (18th c.)  3.18

Ocelot, HMS (1962)  3.85

Office of Economic Readjustment (US)  3.93

Office of Naval Works

      established at the Admiralty (1796)  1.21, 59

      Inspector General: post held by Samuel Bentham (1796–1807)  1.21

      renamed Civil Architect and Engineer of the Navy (1807)  1.21

      James Sadler works in the department (1800)  1.21

      transferred to the Navy Board (1807)  1.21

OEM  2.82

Ogle, Rear Admiral Sir Chaloner: commands Mediterranean fleet  2.15

Ollis family, in the Metal Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.72

Ollivier, Blaise  3.21

Onions, Peter, ironworks foreman at Merthyr Tydfil  3.54

Oran  2.9

Orange, Prince and Princess of: visit Portsmouth Dockyard (1800)  1.93

Ordnance Board

      and Gibraltar  2.26, 57

      Grand Storehouse paid for by the Victualling Board  1.37

      Legg’s Demi-Bastion at Portsmouth  1.37

      New Gun Wharf at Portsmouth (from 1799)  1.37

      transfers land at Weevil to Victualling Board (1828)  1.37

      transfers land in Portsmouth for a new Victualling store (1800–1801)  1.37

Oregrun iron: tested at Portsmouth Dockyard (1783–86)  3.53

Orion, HMS (1910)  3.41

      fire-control system  3.45

Orion-class battleships  3.38

Orpen, Commander H.  3.49n6

Osborn, Vice-Admiral Henry: commands Mediterranean fleet  2.16

Ottoman Empire: and Knights of St John  3.67, 68

Ottley, Captain C. L., Director of Naval Intelligence  3.38, 49n6

Otway, William Henry: Commissioner of Gibraltar Yard  2.58, 83–4

Outremer  3.65, 66

P

PACTE  3.93

Paddington Station  3.34

Paldiski, Estonia  3.92

Palermo: victualling yard at (from 1805)  2.57, 63, 64

Pallas (36), HMS (1757): abandoned (1783)  3.24, 25

Palma, Duke of: tours Portsmouth Dockyard (1768)  1.93

Palmers, Jarrow  3.41, 49n19

Panther (60), HMS (1758)

      part-coppered (1759)  3.12

      at the siege of Gibraltar (1789)  2.38, 39

Parker, Admiral Sir Peter

      commands Jamaica squadron  2.49, 53

      on copper-bottomed ships (1778)  3.20

Parry, Charles, and copper sheathing  3.10–11

Parys Mine Company  1.76

Pasley, Lieutenant General Sir Charles W.  2.84

Pater yard  3.76

patteroes  2.32

paying off  1.99

Payne, Mr, assistant constructor (1905)  3.40

Payne, John: patents grooved rollers (1728)  3.53

Peace of Amiens (1802)

      influence on operational availability of line-of-battle ships vs frigates and below  1.48

      welcomed by Portsmouth Dockyard for consolidation  1.49

Peace transport (1800)  2.61

Peake, Sir Henry

      builds Block Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard with Nicholas Diddams  1.64

      first assistant master shipwright at Chatham  1.60

      opposition to Robert Seppings’ principles  1.13, 17

      Surveyor of the Navy (1806–1822)  1.13, 14, 60, 78

Peake, James: works in the Inspector General’s department (1800)  1.21

Peake, John, Navy Board Surveyor (1806–1822)

      extra assistant Civil Engineer and Architect  1.60

      fellow shipwright apprentice at Chatham with Bentham  1.60

      suggests metal standing rigging  1.25

Pegasus (14), HMS (1776) coppered at Chatham (1776)  3.19

Pelican Life Company  1.104

Pelly, Rear Admiral D. H. R., Director of Dockyards (1957)  3.84

Pembroke Dockyard  3.31–2

      caisson gate  3.34

      Captain Superintendent’s office  3.33, 33–4

      clock tower  3.32

      closed (1947)  3.90

      Dockyard Chapel  3.33

      East Gun Tower  3.33, 34, 92

      Guard House  3.34, 34

      iron structures  3.31–7

      No. 1 Storehouse  3.32, 32

      No. 1 The Terrace (1818)  3.32

      Nos. 1 and 2 slips  3.34

      Nos. 3 and 4 slips  3.93

      No. 7 slip  3.34

      Nos. 8 and 9 slips  3.34

      No. 39 building  3.32

      Sunderland House (c. 1820)  3.33

Pembrokeshire County Council  3.32

Pensacola Harbour  3.16

Pepys, Samuel  2.26

Perseus (20), HMS (1776): coppered at Randall’s yard (c. 1775)  3.19

PHARE  3.93

Philosophical Transactions (1814)  1.15

Phoenix Insurance  1.104

Pickard, James  1.88

Pickle (6), HMS (1799), armed schooner

      present at Trafalgar  1.32

      repairs completed in Plymouth by Joseph Tucker before Trafalgar  1.34

      wages expended on repair £139 5s 4d  1.32

pilgrims  3.66

pine: for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

Pitt, Thomas: Clerk of the Cheque at the Victualling Yard, Portsmouth

      salary  1.39–40

Plymouth: as Admiralty borough (after 1832)  3.79

Plymouth Dock Provident Institution  3.77

Plymouth merchantman  2.25

Plymouth Royal Dockyard

      battleship building times (1893–1904)  3.49n19

      Commissioner  3.77, 77–8

      Conqueror (74), HMS, inventory of tasks completed on  1.34

      fire-proof buildings to Bentham’s plans  1.27

      friendly societies (1816)  3.77

      Joiners’ and Carpenters’ Shop, Simon Goodrich’s plans for  1.67

      Pickle, HMS, inventory of tasks completed on  1.34

      reservoir, Simon Goodrich’s plans for  1.67

      rope production  1.53

      rope-spinning house constructed of cast iron (1813–15)  3.31

      Royal William Victualling Yard

            iron roof  3.31

            location  3.92

            officers petition for equal pay with Portsmouth (1803)  1.41

            predictions of demand (1794–1815)  1.41

            single system with Deptford and Portsmouth  1.37

      Sandwich’s visitation (1771)  3.18

      ships in Ordinary copper-fastened and re-coppered (1786)  3.26

      Tucker, Joseph, master shipwright

            brother of Benjamin  1.59

            dockyard papers and work refitting ships present at Trafalgar  1.31–34

            gives details of what work is done when ships go into Ordinary  1.32

Pococke, Dr Richard  1.94

Poggio, Albert  2.86

Polaris strategic missile  3.85, 86

Polhem, Christoph: uses grooved rollers (1745)  3.53

Pollen, Arthur H.

      Argo Company  3.47

      fire-control system  3.45, 46, 47, 50n59

      ‘Fire Control and Long-Range Gunnery’ (1904)  3.46

      and Lord Fisher  3.47

      relationship with the Admiralty  3.50n54, 50n55

Polonceau, C.  3.33, 34

Poole, Jeffrey, MP  1.60

Porcupine (24), HMS  2.39, 41, 42, 43

Port Famine  3.15

Port Mahon, Minorca

      advantages of  2.12

      British base for the Mediterranean fleet (1738–39)  2.14

      British loss of  2.9, 12, 44

      careening at  2.12

      cost of (1747)  2.12

      English base against the Barbary regencies  2.11

      preferable to Tangier  2.21

      supports Gibraltar in the siege of 1727  2.43

      victualling yard at  2.57, 59, 63, 64

Portland (50), HMS (1723)  2.34

Portland (50), HMS (1770)

      coppered using ‘prepared paper’ (1779)  3.22

      trials Mr Hunt’s composition against shipworm (1771)  3.19

Portland Royal Dockyard  2.66, 69

      closure (1958)  3.83, 84

Portmore, David Colyear, 1st Earl of  2.36

Porto del Galere, Malta 70

      location map  3.67

Porto del Mandraccio, Rhodes  3.67

Portsea Concert Room, St George’s Square  1.104

Portsea Island  1.95

Portsmouth

      bake house (Victualling Board’s)

            built in 1740  1.35

            contains only six ovens  1.35

            fire hazard  1.35

      bankruptcies in  1.96

      bookshops

            great variety of books available  1.103–104

            senior dockyard workers good customers  1.103, 104

      Camber  1.100–101

      coroner  1.102

      description (1748)  1.95

      fire insurance agents (1783–1805)  1.104

      fleet reviews (1773 and 1778)  1.98

      medicine and drug warehouse  1.103

      military control of, eighteenth century

            curfew guns  1.98

            military posts  1.98

            opening and shutting town gates  1.98

      Naval Academy: pupils get drunk in town  1.99

      population (1725–1811)  1.94

      Portsea: street names introduced  1.104

      prisoners of war  1.95

      sailors cause problems in

            complaining about poor food in HMS Namur (January 1758 )  1.99

            demolishing a public house (March 1758 and February 1766)  1.99

            paid off from HMS Apollo and HMS Arethusa (April 1802)  1.99

      St George’s Church: built by dockyard workers (1753)  1.97

      storehouses for dry provisions

            large building added (1782)  1.36

            originally one storehouse (1740)  1.36

      street names introduced to Portsea  1.104

      Suckling, Maurice (1726–1778), Naval Comptroller, returns as MP  1.97

      town clerk  1.102

      town life effectively controlled by

            garrison governor  1.98

            mayor  1.98

      resident dockyard commissioner  1.98

Portsmouth Royal Dockyard

      Admiralty Progress Books, hold near complete records of ships entering  1.50

      Admiralty Visitation (1802)  1.62–63

      battleship building times (1893–1904)  3.49n19

      Bentham’s plans to reorganise  1.26, 59

      Block Mills

            Samuel Beach, superintendent  1.68, 71

            building designed by Samuel Bunce and Edward Holl  1.64

            built by Portsmouth Dockyard’s craftsmen under Henry Peake and Nicholas Diddams  1.64

            Commission of Naval Enquiry (1802)  1.59

            conceived by Bentham  1.63

            construction of (1802)  1.62

            furnaces constructed  1.68

            include Wood Mills, Metal Mills, and Millwrights’ shop  1.63

            machines designed by Marc Isambard Brunel  1.60

            Mirza Abul Hassan Khan, Persian Shah’s representative, tours (1810)  1.93

            productivity of output  1.55, 78

            run by Simon Goodrich  1.65

            savings to the public  1.22, 78, 79

            state at 3 October 1805  1.74

            supply all the navy’s blocks by 1807  1.55, 78

            swing arm circular saw  1.66

            workforce

                        efficiency of  1.55, 58

                        pay and conditions for  1.69–74

                        recruited from outside the Dockyard  1.64

      blocks, wood

            automatic mortising machine for (Brunel’s)  1.87–89

            circular saw for (Brunel’s)  1.86, 90

            coaks for  1.78, 92

            manufacture of  1.55–8

            metal bushes  1.61

            smaller vs larger  1.60

            supply of, to the Royal Navy  1.56, 78

      Boat Pond converted to a basin by Samuel Bentham  1.26

      boiler house (1830)  1.80

      bucket ladder dredger driven by steam engine, designed by Samuel Bentham (1802)  1.28

      Camber Docks

            capable of docking two large frigates or three sloops  1.26, 52

            converted from North Camber or channel by Bentham  1.26, 52

            divided by a caisson  1.26, 3.34

            steam engines for  1.26, 67

      circular sawing machines, Samuel Goodrich’s drawings for  1.67

      Clerk of the Survey (1819)  3.77–8

      Clerks of the Cheque

            Joseph Davis  1.104

            Thomas Snell  1.105

      coal yard, Simon Goodrich’s plans for  1.67

      coffer dam, introduced by Bentham  1.27

      composition against shipworm (1737)  3.10

      contribution to the fleet’s success during the Napoleonic Wars  1.58

      copper furnaces converted to sheathing plates (1768–70)  3.20

      covered docks and slips introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.26

      Cruttenden (East India Company ship): repaired (April 1770)  1.100

      curfew gun  1.98

      Danish Asiatic Company, uses Portsmouth Dockyard for repairs

            Johanna and Maria (May 1787)  1.101

            Providentia (1785)  1.101

      docking days (1793–1815)  1.50, see also ton dock days

      dry docks

            Barfleur (90), HMS (1768), spends 323 days in  1.50

            double dock replaced by docks numbers two and three  1.26, 51

            enlargement of non-tidal basin  1.52

            introduction of caissons  1.52

            ships spent there used as a measure of dockyard output  1.50

            steam engine for  1.67

            Voorland (Dutch East India Company ship), stays in dock for repair for 65 days  1.102

      Duke of Palma visits (1786)  1.93

      Dutch East India Company

            agent (from 1749) George Huish  1.102

            deserters find refuge  1.103

            outward-bound Indiamen call regularly  1.101

            vessel size and types range from 1300 ton Admiral De Suffren to 136 ton packetboat Kraai  1.102

            Voorland stays in dock for repair for 65 days  1.102

      efficiency increase during the Napoleonic Wars  1.58

      Elfi Bay, the Mameluke Chief, tours (1803)  1.93

      embezzlement (1774–1780)  1.98–99

      fire extinguishing system, introduced by Bentham  1.24

      fire-proof buildings to Bentham’s plans  1.27

      fires in

            1767  1.101

            1770  1.61, 101

      Fleet Maintenance and Repair Base (1984)  3.90

      Franz Joseph Haydn: turned away from visiting (1794)  1.93

      great basin, proposal to line the gates with copper against the shipworm  3.10

      horses

            drive the cement mill  1.28

            supplied by Thomas Fitzherbert  1.95

      machine tools driven by steam  1.24, 63

      Mast Pond: Samuel Bentham’s plans for improvement  1.63

      Master Boat Builders

            Edward Hunt  1.105

      Master House Carpenters

            Nicholas Vass  1.97

      Master Millwrights

            Mr Linacre  1.72

      Master Sailmakers

      Thomas Hills  1.96

      Master Shipwrights (aka Builders)

            Nicholas Diddams  1.64, 78

            John Lock  1.104

            Sir Henry Peake  1.60, 64

            Mr Waugh  1.106

      Metal Mills, introduced by Bentham (1803)

            copper melter, pay of  1.71–72

            furnacemen  1.72, 74

            improve quality of metal and remove reliance on copper merchants  1.25, 68

            iron knees replace wooden knees  1.53

            major supplier of copper for the Royal Navy  1.25, 53, 58

            make metal parts for blocks  1.63

            manufacture cast iron, mixed metals and copper sheathing  1.25

            plans of  1.52

            re-process copper  1.25, 60, 68

            run by John Lloyd  1.64

            savings to the public  1.25, 78, 79

            smelt, cast and roll metal  1.25

            use commercially established and proven developments  1.51

            use spare steam capacity from pumping docks  1.60

            workforce pay and conditions  1.70–72, 74

      mill for making cement

            built by Simon Goodrich  1.65

            horse-powered  1.28

            introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.28

      Millwrights’ department

            help to fit and improve articles used on board ships  1.24

            introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.24, 53

            make machine tools for other dockyards  1.24

            maintain the whole water system including the fire extinguishing systems.  1.24

      mooring chains  3.52

      mould loft (1905–6)  3.40, 41

      mud barges, to accompany the steam dredgers  1.28

      nineteenth-century improvements  2.66, 67, 69

      North Basin

            capable of docking seven or eight frigates  1.26, 52

            converted from North Boat Pond and channel  1.26, 52

            most cost-effective improvement in the Royal Dockyards  1.52

            steam engines for  1.26

      No. 5 slip  3.38

      No. 6 boathouse  3.90

      No. 11 store  3.93Peace of Amiens welcomed for consolidation  1.49

      part-coppers HMS Medway and America (1760)  3.12

      part-coppers HMS Norfolk and Panther (1759)  3.12

      pension society  3.(1820)  3.77

      performance increase during Napoleonic Wars  1.51

      Prince and Princess of Wales visit (1803 and 1805)  1.93

      Pump House: 12HP steam engine erected by Simon Goodrich  1.65

      reciprocating saw mill, Simon Goodrich’s drawings for  1.67

      reservoir, improved by Samuel Bentham  1.27, 60

      Ropery and Sail Cloth Manufactory (1804)  1.25, 53

            Master Ropemaker sidelined  1.53

            steam power a fire risk  1.53

      sailings from, by ship type  1.49

      sawmill

            introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.24

            pumping and sawing apparatus  1.73

      seasoning timber

            Samuel Bentham’s experiments  1.26–27

            sheds established by Lord Sandwich  1.26

            workshop built over the reservoir  1.27

      Second Sea Lord’s offices  3.90

      Sheffield, W. E.: Master of the Mills  1.25

      ships in Ordinary copper-fastened and re-coppered (1786)  3.26

      smiths  1.53, 67

      steam dredger, designed by Samuel Bentham  1.28, 52

      steam engines at

            12HP machine  1.67

            30HP machine  1.67

            50HP machine  1.67

            ballast-heaving engine  1.67

            to drive pumps and machinery  1.23, 67

            to pump fresh or sea water in case of fire  1.27

      Storekeepers

            John Allcott  1.104

            John Greenway  1.105

      Surgeons

            David Ramsay Kerr  1.105

      survey, 1774  1.93

      ton dock days per year: increase of 107% (1793–1815)  1.50, 58

      Victualling Office see Victualling Office

      water, fresh

            distributed by cast-iron piping in two adjacent courses  1.27, 45n, 67

                  raised to an elevated reservoir by steam engine  1.27, 67

      shipped from Southampton Water (until 1797)  1.27

      Watering Island, plans for (1801)  1.37

      well sunk by Bentham  1.27, 37

      wharf crane, Simon Goodrich’s plans for  1.67

      Wood Mills, introduced by Samuel Bentham

            able to supply from October 1807 all the navy’s need of blocks  1.78

            built over the reservoir  1.27

            cost recovered in three years from production savings  1.58

            engine keepers of  1.57

            foreman of  1.57

            leading edge technology  1.51

            lit by lamps not candles  1.27, 81

            machinery repairers  1.57

            Master of  1.57

            model for mills elsewhere  1.25

            steam powered  1.25, 60, 67

            supply the fleet with a ‘lean manned’ and very efficient mill  1.58

      workers in

            apprentices biggest proportional increase during Napoleonic Wars  1.54

            change in the distribution of various groups during Napoleonic Wars  1.54

            discharged for refusing to go Woolwich  1.96

            effect of war on labour opportunities  1.95, 96

            largest elements are skilled workers during Napoleonic Wars  1.54

            numbers of  1.80, 94, 96

            recruitment of  1.54

            senior dockyard workers good bookshop customers  1.103, 104

            strikes (1775 and 1805)  1.96, 99

            suspicious of proposed changes (1783)  1.99

            tables of

                  by skill levels  1.54

                  by work areas  1.54

            travelling expenses  1.96

            wood millers  1.25

            work Christmas Day 1792  1.95

      wrought iron  3.51–6

Post Office packets, coppered  3.23–4

Postle-thwaite transport (1800)  2.61

Pownall, Edward, deputy commissioner  2.59

Pownall, Edward, Clerk of the Survey at Plymouth Dockyard (1819)  3.77–8

pozzolanic cement: in the Rosia Water Tanks  2.84–5

‘prepared paper’ for coppering ships  3.21

Priestman, Commodore Henry: commands Sallee squadron  2.19

Priddy’s Hard, Gosport  3.91

Prince (98), HMS (1788)  2.83

Prince Frederick (70), HMS (1714)  2.35

Prince George transport (1801)  2.61

Prince Gustavus (Swedish Indiaman)  1.101

Prince Royal [Princess Royal] (90), HMS (1773)  2.59

Princess Augusta (Swedish Indiaman)  1.101

Princess Royal, HMS (1911)  3.49n35

prisoners of war, held in the Portsmouth area  1.95

prize money  1.99

profanity, in the royal dockyards  3.78

Progress Books, Admiralty: hold near complete records of ships entering Portsmouth Dockyard  1.50

Prosperine (r. Proserpine, 24) HMS (1777): copper sheathing and mixed-metal braces and pintles (1777)  3.20

Protheroe, Lt George, of HMS Canterbury  3.59

Providentia (Danish Asiatic Company ship): repaired at Portsmouth Dockyard (1785)  1.101

Public Navy Works Loans  2.69

puddling process for producing wrought iron  3.53, 54

Puerto Rico  2.9

pulley blocks

      circular saw for  1.86, 90

      machine tools, Brunel not responsible for introduction  1.85

      mortising machine for shells, Brunel’s  1.87–89

Puntal: careening at  2.21

Puntalles  2.35

Q

Quarterly Review  1.15

Queen (90), HMS (1769): spends 1,151 days (1789–1792) in dry dock in Portsmouth Dockyard  1.50

Queen Elizabeth-class  3.47

Queen Elizabeth, HMS (1913)  3.41

Queen Mary, HMS (1912)

      at Jutland  3.44, 50n38

      wreck found  3.43

Queensway, Gibraltar  2.83

R

Ramillies (74), HMS (1763)  3.24, 25

Randall’s yard, Thames  3.19

range finders, in battlecruisers  3.43, 45, 46

Raymund II, Count of Tripoli  3.73n2

Redbridge, Hampshire: Bentham’s steam engine at  1.23

Reke, Samuel

      first Mechanist in the Office of Naval Works  1.65

      Simon Goodrich acts as draughtsman to then succeeds him (in 1799)  1.67

      lists works carried out under Simon Goodrich  1.65

Renaval  3.91, 93

Rennie, John (the elder: 1761–1821)  3.31

      inspects Portsmouth Dockyard  1.79

      installation of Boulton and Watt steam engine in HMS Congo  1.17

      and the presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.12

      proposes Robert Seppings to the Royal Society  1.16

Rennie, Sir John (1794–1874)  3.31

Renown (30), HMS (ex-Renommée) (1744), part-coppered (1762)  3.12

Renown, HMS (1916): build time  3.49n19

Repulse, HMS (1916): build time  3.49n19

Repulse (floating battery), HMS  2.41, 42, 43

Revel, Mr  2.34

reverbatory furnaces  3.53, 54

revisers  3.72

Rhodes  3.66, 67

      captured by Suleiman the Magnificent (1522)  3.69

      captured by the Knights of St John (1309)  3.67

      galley fleet  3.68

      locator map  3.69

      naval arsenal  3.67

      Porto del Mandraccio  3.67

Richards, Sir Francis: Governor of Gibraltar  2.83, 86

Riley, Ray

       ‘Henry Cort and the Development of Wrought Iron Manufacture in the 1780s: The Naval Connection’  3.51–6

       ‘Marc Brunel’s pulley block-making machinery: operation and assessment’  1.85–92

riveters (1906)  3.39

Robert transport (1800)  2.61

Roberts, John  3.41, 43, 44–5

Robinson, Les  2.76, 77

Rochefort  3.89

Rockingham, Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess  2.54

Rodney, Admiral George  2.44, 3.23

      Commander-in-Chief West Indies  2.49, 50, 53

      relieves Gibraltar (1780)  2.17, 38

Roebuck (44), HMS (1774): coppered using ‘prepared paper’ at Woolwich (1779)  3.21

Rogers, Heigham  1.75, 84n

rollers, grooved, for iron working  3.53

roman cement, mill at Sheerness established by Samuel Bentham  1.28

Rood, Mr  1.104

Rooke, Admiral George

      captures Gibraltar (1704)  2.9, 19

      Mediterranean experience  2.11, 28

Ropery and Sail Cloth Manufactory, established by Samuel Bentham (1804)  1.25

ropes produced by Portsmouth Royal Dockyard: did not develop during the wars (1793–1815)  1.53

Rosia Bay Victualling Yard, Gibraltar

      destroyed (2006)  2.7

Rosia Cottages, Gibraltar  2.84

Rosia Distillery, Gibraltar  2.84

Rosia House, Gibraltar  2.83

Rosia Water Tanks, Gibraltar  2.81–7

      built (1799–1804)  2.58, 83

      construction materials  2.84–5

      described  2.84, 86

      dimensions  2.84

      destroyed (2006)  2.83

      estimated costs of  2.58

Ross, Rear Admiral Sir John Lockheart  2.39, 41

Rosyth Dockyard  3.83, 85

Rotherham, Captain Edward  2.83

Rowley, Vice Admiral William: commands Mediterranean fleet (1745)  2.15

Royal African Company  1.97

Royal Clarence Yard, new victualling facilities at the Weevil site (1828)  1.37

Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments in Wales: and Pembroke Dockyard  3.32

Royal Dockyards: repayment work (after 1945)  3.82–3

Royal Engineers: and RN dockyard buildings  3.31

Royal Exchange fire insurance company  1.104

Royal George (110), HMS (1756)

      capsized (1782)  3.24

      coppered (1780)  3.22

Royal George (100), HMS (1788)  1.80

      monument in Kingston churchyard  1.105

Royal Gunpowder Factory, Woolwich  3.33

Royal Naval Cordite Factory, Holton Heath  3.92

Royal Navy

      borrows the Ganges (East India Company ship) as a transport (1780)  1.101

      composition of (1793–1815)  1.48–49

      Humphrey Davy’s connection with  1.18

      losses from all causes (1793–1815)  1.47

      Mediterranean Fleet, see Mediterranean Fleet

      steamships built at Woolwich by Oliver Lang  1.17

Royal Oak (70), HMS (1713)  2.34

Royal Society  1.12–18

      awards Copley Gold Medal to Robert Seppings (1818)  1.16

      in Somerset House  1.12

Royal Sovereign (100), HMS (1786)  2.83

Royal Yacht Squadron, Gibraltar  2.67

Rufford transport (1800)  2.61

Rule, Sir William, Navy Board Surveyor (1793–1813)  1.63, 64

Russel (74), HMS (1764), coppered using ‘prepared paper’ (1779)  3.22

Russel, HMS (1901): build time  3.49n19

Ryarsh, brick store at  3.82

S

Sadler, James, works in the Inspector General’s department (1800)  1.21

St Ann’s Church, Portsmouth  1.97

St Eustatius  2.50

St Firmin (or Fermin) (ex-San Firmin) (14), HMS  2.39

St George’s Church, Portsmouth: built by dockyard workers (1753)  1.97

St Helens, copper smelters  3.23

St Jeremy’s Bay  2.15

St Lo, Captain George, Commissioner of Chatham Dockyard  3.59, 60

St Michael (ex-San Miguel) (74), HMS (1773)  2.42, 42–3

St Michel, Balthazar, Agent General of the Victualling

      at Gibraltar  2.24

      at Tangier  2.22

      report on storeships at Gibraltar (1681)  2.26

      returns to England (1681)  2.24, 26

St Thomas’s Church, Portsmouth  1.97

St Vincent, Admiral Sir John Jervis, Earl

      and agents victualler in the Mediterranean  2.56, 57, 58

      appointed First Lord of the Admiralty (1801)  1.59

      appoints Robert Seppings as Master Shipwright at Chatham (1804)  1.10

      builds Rosia Water Tanks, Gibraltar  2.83

      and the civil branch of the Navy  1.59–60, 61

      close blockade of Brest (1799)  1.9

      and Commission of Naval Enquiry  1.74

      leaves Admiralty (15 May 1803)  1.60

St Vincent, HMS (1909): built at Portsmouth Dockyard  3.41, 49n19

St Vincent House, Gibraltar  2.83

Saintes, Battle of (1782)  3.23

Salé (Sallee), Barbary regency: privateers or corsairs  2.7, 9

Salisbury (50), HMS (1769), copper braces and pintles (1787)  3.30n188

Sallee squadron

      John Baker commands  2.13

      based in Gibraltar  2.11

      based in Lisbon  2.7

      Charles Cornwall commands  2.13

      Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell, commodore  2.11

Salvago, Fra Giolama  3.71

Samaria (liner)  2.79n

San Antonio di Padova (56) (1727)  3.72

San Giocomo (3rd rate)  3.73

San Giorgio (56) (1719)  3.72

San Giovanni (frigate) (1798)  3.72

San Giovanni (56) (1718)  3.72, 73

San Giuseppe (frigate)  3.73

San Ildefonso (74) (Spanish): used as depot for stores at Spithead  1.36

San Juan Nepomuceno (74) (Spanish)  2.83

San Miguel (72) (Spanish)  2.42, see also St Michael (ex-San Miguel), HMS

San Vicenzo (56) (1720)  3.72

San Zacharia (frigate) (1765)  3.72

Sandwich, John Montagu, 4th Earl of, First Lord of the Admiralty

      backs Thomas Fitzherbert as Arundel’s MP (1780)  1.95

      and Commons inquiry of 1782  2.47, 53

      compositions against shipworm  3.18, 19

      copper sheathing for ships  3.13, 14–15

      coppering programme (1778–79)  3.20, 21

      experimental sheathing for ships (1773)  3.18

      and relief of Gibraltar  2.48

      returns to office (1771)  3.18

      visitation of Plymouth Dockyard (1771)  3.18

      visitation of Sheerness Dockyard (1771)  3.26

      visits George III (1779)  3.22

      visits Portsmouth Dockyard (1775)  99

      and the Western Squadron  2.50

Sandy Hook  2.16

Sandys, Duncan: Defence Review (1957)  3.83

Santa Caterina (frigate) (1784)  3.72, 73

Santa Elizabetta (frigate) (1783)  3.72

Santa Maria del Pilar (frigate) (1733)  3.72

Santa Teresa (frigate) (1733)  3.72

Sapphire (32/28), HMS (1675)  2.23, 24

Saxton, Charles  1.68, 70

Scalmonte, Fra  3.71

Schäffhausen Bridge, inspiration to Robert Seppings  1.16

Scarborough (20), HMS (1740)

      sheathing treated with Mr Bernard’s composition (1773)  3.17

      sheathing treated with Mr Jackson’s composition (1766)  3.17

scavelmen

      Portsmouth landlords  1.104

      proposed as second engine keepers at the Wood Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard  1.70

Scheldt, blockade of (1803–1805)  1.9

Schonderloo (Dutch East India Company ship)  1.102, 102–103

Scorpion sloop  1.100

Scott, Colonel John  2.22

Scott, Sir Percy  3.44, 45

Segeswick, Thomas  1.104

Selkirk, George Douglas-Hamilton, 10th Earl of, First Lord of the Admiralty (1959)  3.84

Senglea Yard, Malta (1767)  3.71

Seppings, Sir Robert

      appointed Master Shipwright at Chatham (1804)  1.10

      appointed Third Surveyor of the Navy (14 June 1813)  1.14

      awarded Copley Gold Medal of the Royal Society (1818)  1.16

      candidate for the proposed dockyard at Northfleet  1.14

      critical reference to the Navy Board  1.14

      criticism of merchant shipbuilding practice  1.17

      designs first generation of Royal Navy steam vessels  1.17

      designs HMS Congo for exploration of the river  1.17

      dismissal (1832)  1.18

      Sir William Domett a supporter  1.14

      elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society (11 November 1814)  1.16

      explanation of his system  1.10

      Simon Goodrich reports on his system  1.16

      knighthood  1.17

      Sir Henry Peake opposes his system  1.13, 1.17

      produces developments in naval architecture (1800–1820)  1.10

      recommended for major financial reward  1.17

      Royal Society papers

            ‘On a new principle of constructing His Majesty’s ships of war’ (10 March 1814)  1.15

            ‘On a New Principle of Constructing Ships in the Mercantile Navy’ (2 and 9 March1820)  1.17

            ‘On the great strength given to Ships of War by the application of Diagonal braces’ (27 November 1817)  1.16

      system of diagonal riders  1.10, 16: see also Howe, HMS; Justitia; Malabar, HMS; Northumberland, HMS

      timber ship sheds  3.34

      use of model and drawings to illustrate principles to Admiralty  1.12–13

      Sir Charles Yorke’s involvement  1.10, 16, 17

Serfaty, William  2.84, 86

Seydlitz, SMS: at Jutland  3.44

Sharpe, Thomas  1.93

sheathing against shipworm

      ‘black stuff’  3.10

      brads  3.10

      ‘brown stuff’  3.10

      ‘common’ (deal or pine planks)  3.10

      copper see copper

      and electrolytic action  3.10

      lead  3.10, 18

      Mr Bernard’s composition for  3.19

      Mr Bertaud’s composition for  3.13

      Mr Bridge’s composition for  3.13

      Mr Brisbane’s composition for  3.17

      Mr Constable’s composition for  3.19

      Mr Hunt’s composition for  3.19

      Mr Jackson’s composition for  3.17

      Mr Lee’s composition for  3.10

      Mr Smith’s composition for  3.19

      ‘white stuff’  3.10

      zinc  3.23

sheaves for pulley blocks, manufacture  1.90–91

Sheerness (32), HMS (1691)  2.13

Sheerness Royal Dockyard

      closure (1958–60)  3.83, 84, 90

      coffer dam and ‘foundation masses’, introduced by Samuel Bentham  1.27–28

      fire-proof buildings to Samuel Bentham’s plans  1.27

      mill for making roman cement, established by Samuel Bentham  1.28

      ships in Ordinary copper-fastened and re-coppered (1786)  3.26

      Storekeepers

            Thomas Snell  1.105

      surgeon  3.76

      trials Mr Constable’s composition against shipworm (1771)  3.19

      tries Mr Florry’s iron plates (1772)  3.18

      well sunk by Samuel Bentham  1.27

sheathing, copper: Humphrey Davy’s electricity based protection systems a failure  1.18

Sheffield, W. E.: Master of the Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.25

Sheldon, Matthew, ‘A tale of two cities: the facilities, work and impact of the Victualling Office in Portsmouth, 1793–1815’  1.35–45

shells for pulley blocks, manufacture of  1.85–90

Sheres, Henry  2.21

ship losses, during the Napoleonic Wars  1.47

ships of the line: docking frequency  3.24

shipworm (Teredo navalis3.9

      docking and careening ships infected by  3.10, 24

      geographical distribution  3.9–10

      life cycle  3.9–10

      methods of prevention  3.12–13, 17; see also copper; sheathing

shipwrights

      Samuel Bentham  1.60

      Nicholas Diddams  1.64, 78

      William Gray  1.60

      John Lock  1.104

      Sir Henry Peake  1.60, 64

      Sir Robert Seppings, see Seppings, Sir Robert

      William Stride  1.105

      Joseph Tucker, see Tucker, Joseph

      Mr Waugh  1.106

Shoram (32) (r. Shoreham), HMS (1694)  3.62

Shovell, Admiral Sir Cloudesley

      commands Sallee squadron  2.19, 27

      Mediterranean experience  2.11, 28

      at Gibraltar (1684)  2.27

      at Tangier (1681)  2.25

Shrewsbury (74), HMS (1758), condemned (1783)  3.24, 25

Simmonds, Mr: quartermaster at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.105

Simonstown: naval yard  2.74

‘Sinbad’, on the dry dock at Gibraltar (1890)  2.70

Singapore Dockyard

      Chinese labour force at (1941)  2.77–8

      closure (1958)  3.83, 84

Sir John Hawkins’ Hospital, Chatham  3. 59

Sir William Arrol & Co.: dockyard crane (1958)  2.76

Skottowe, Richard  1.99

Skybolt air-launched missile  3.85, 86

Slade, Thomas, Surveyor of the Navy, and copper sheathing  3.12

slave ships, coppered  3.24

slaves, in Malta  3.71

Smart, Mr, and the presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.12

Smeaton, John

      cast iron gear wheels  1.89

      pozzolanic cement  2.85

Smith, Mr, and composition against shipworm  3.19

Smith, Mr, copper contractor (1757)  3.29

Smith, George: Navy Board secretary  1.80, 81, 3.79n1

Snell, Thomas  1.105

Snodgrass, Gabriel: his system of internal bracing for older, smaller vessels  1.9

Soames, William, vice consul at Gibraltar  2.24

Somerset House: home of the Royal Society in early nineteenth century  1.12

Society of Arts: prizes awarded to Simon Goodrich  1.65

Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge: links with Portsmouth  1.97

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel: missionaries use Portsmouth as departure point  1.97

Solebay (bomb), HMS (1711)  2.34

Sonne pinnace (1586)  3.81

Southwell, Daniel  1.105

Spanish navy

      coppering programme  3.22–3

      fleet at Gibraltar destroyed by Jacob van Heemskerck (1607)  2.10

Spanish Succession, War of  2.13, 31

Spanker, HMS (stationary floating battery): coppered (1795)  3.27

Speaker (East India Company ship): repaired in Portsmouth Dockyard (March 1772)  1.100

Speedwell, HMS (20) (in 1718)  2.13

Speedwell, HMS (14) (in 1780)  2.39

Spencer, George John, 2nd Earl

      Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

      First Lord of the Admiralty 62

Spencer, John, 5th Earl  2.67

Spithead

      fleet winters there throughout the 1790s  1.40

      San Ildefonso (74) (Spanish) used as a depot for stores  1.36

      and victuallers in 1781  2.52

spruce: for galley construction and repair (14th c.)  3.68

Square Tower, Portsmouth

      slaughterhouse on adjoining land  1.36

      store  1.36

Stag (32), HMS (1758): coppered at Chatham (1769)  3.17, 20

Standard (64), HMS (1782): built with mixed-metal bolts  3.26

Stanley, Hans, MP: Admiralty Commissioner  1.60

‘Statements of Services’ papers by Samuel Bentham (1812–1813)

      annotated with marginal references to the dates of official letters  1.21

      ‘Statement of Services relative to the Improvement and Formation of Naval Arsenals’  1.21

      ‘Statement of Services relative to the Improvement of Manufactures requisite in Naval Arsenals’  1.21

      summarizes what the author claimed to have contributed to dockyard operations  1.21

steam

      Boulton and Watt engine, installed in HMS Congo  1.17

      demonstrated at Westminster by Samuel Bentham  1.23–24

      Dockyards (1812–1831)  1.80

      Navy Board opposes  1.23

      Metal Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.60

      pumps at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.23, 26

      Sadler steam engine  1.64, 77

      steam bucket ladder dredgers

      in the Thames  1.28

      machinery supplied by John Lloyd  1.64

      at Portsmouth (1802), increases the depth of water at the tidal entrance  1.28, 52

      Wood Mills at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.60

steamships: Oliver Lang builds at Woolwich Dockyard  1.17

Stenhouse, Mr  2.26

Stephens, Sir Philip, Secretary of the Admiralty  1.60, 74

      career  1.82n

      and copper sheathing  3.12

      siege of Gibraltar  2.52

Sterling Castle (70), HMS (1723)  2.34

Stoete, Hendrik  1.102

storing and fitting naval vessels within the boundary of a dockyard

      deepening and enlarging the basin  1.26

      halving the length of the existing double dock  1.26

      using caissons or floating dams to serve as gates  1.26, 51

      using pumps with moveable steam engines to control water level in docks  1.26

Stormont (East India Company ship)  1.101

strength of metals

      ascertaining the strength of different metals begun by Bentham (1798)  1.25

      Samuel Bentham provides specification of mixed metals to private manufacturers by 1813  1.25

      improvements made in the quality of mixed metals  1.25

Stride, William, shipwright  1.105

Strutt, William, and fireproof textile mills (1790s)  3.31

Stuart, Charles Edward  2.15, 33

Stubbington Manor, leased by Thomas Fitzherbert  1.95

subsistence money for artificers (1805)  3.77

Success (20), HMS (1740): sheathed with brads against the shipworm (1762)  3.10

Suckling, Maurice (1726–1778), Naval Comptroller

      appealed to by Nelson  1.100

      returns as MP for Portsmouth  1.97

Suleiman the Magnificent, Sultan  3.68–9, 70

Sumida, Jon Tsuro  3.37, 45, 48

Sun Fire Insurance  1.104

Sunbeam (yacht)  2.67

Success transport (1801)  2.61

Suez Canal  2.66

Sunderland, Robert, Earl of  2.24, 28

Superb, HMS (1907): build time  3.49n19

Surveyors of the Navy: see Henslow, John; Hunt, Edward; Peake, Sir Henry; Peake, John; Rule, Sir William; Seppings, Sir Robert; Symonds, Captain Sir William

Swallow (50), HMS (1719)  2.34

Swallow (14), HMS (1769), first fully coppered vessel

      coppered at Deptford (1770)  3.17, 20

      re-coppered at Bombay (1776)  3.17

Swallow packet, coppered at Deptford (1778)  3.24

Sweden

      copper supply to the French navy  3.23

      copper supply to the Royal Navy  3.19

Swedish navy, coppering programme  3.23

Swift (14), HMS (1777): coppering delayed for want of copper sheets (1777)  3.19

Swiftsure (74), HMS (1787)  2.83

Swinton, Lt Samuel, English agent in Paris  2.52

Sutton, Samuel: new commander of HMS Victory at re-commissioning (9 April 1803)  1.31

Symonds, Captain Sir William: Surveyor of the Navy (1832)  1.18

T

Taaffe, Emma, ‘From mortar mixers to nuclear submarines: some extracts from the post-1945 history of Chatham dockyard’ 3.81–7

Tamar (or Tamer) (18), HMS (1758)

      careened in Port Royal yard, Jamaica (1765)  3.16

      carries spare iron braces because of electrolysis  3.15

      condition of  3.(1765)  3.15

      coppered for the Pacific (1764)  3.15

      surveyed at Deptford (1766)  3.16

Tangier

      acquired by England (1661)  2.10, 20

      careening at  2.10, 20, 21

      careening hulk at (1680)  2.21–2

      English garrison  2.20

      English merchants refuse to settle  2.20

      evacuated (1684)  2.27

      harbour at  2.20

      mole at, see Tangier mole

      Moors, treaty with (1680)  2.22

      ships’ stores unavailable at  2.21

      storehouses at  2.21

      transports’ agent  2.21

      used by Genoese merchants  2.20

      victualling agent (1678)  2.22

      victualling depot  2.7, 21

Tangier mole  2.10, 11

      blown up (1684)  2.27

      contract for its construction (1663)  2.20–21

      surveyed by five masters from the Mediterranean fleet (1680)  2.23

Tariq: constructs base at Gibraltar (1711)  2.7

Tartar (32), HMS (1702)  2.13

Tartar (28), HMS (1756): coppered for a voyage to Jamaica (1763)  3.15

Tartar Indiaman  3.24

task work  1.81

Taylor, Dr C., Secretary to the Society of Arts, and the presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.12

Taylor, George Ledwell, Surveyor of Buildings  3.31, 33

Taylors of Southampton, block contractors  1.60

      blockmakers borne on Portsmouth Dockyard’s books  1.61

      dispute over continuation of contract and pricing  1.61–62

      machinery used by  1.60–61, 85, 86, 88

      supply blocks to the Royal Navy  1.60, 61, 78

      supply blocks to the East India Company  1.78

Temeraire, HMS (1907): build time  3.49n19

Temple Mills copper works  1.84

Teonge, Henry  3.71

Teredo navalis see shipworm

Terrible (74), HMS (1762)  3.24, 25

Tetuan  2.60, 63

textile mills, fireproof  3.31

Thames, River

      cast-iron tunnel  1.65

      steam bucket ladder dredger  1.28

Thames Iron Works  3.49n18

Thomas, James H., ‘Portsmouth yard and town in the age of Nelson (1758–1805) – a relationship examined’  1.93–107

Thomas, Roger, ‘The Building of HMS Dreadnought and Dreadnought Battlecruiser Gunnery 1905–1916’  3.37–50

Thompson, Mrs Robert  3.59

Thompson, Captain Sir Thomas Boulden, Controller of the Navy  1.10, 79

Thorneycroft, Sir John  3.48n3

Thunder (bomb), HMS  2.34

Thunderer (74), HMS (1782)  2.83

Thunderer, HMS (1911): fire-control system  3.45

Thurloe, John  2.19

Thynne (packet): coppered at Deptford (1775)  3.24

tidal mill, Portsmouth  1.36

Tiger, HMS (1913): at Jutland  3.44

tilt hammers  3.53

ton dock days per year at Portsmouth Dockyard: increase of 107% during the Napoleonic Wars  1.50

Topham, Jones and Railton  2.68

Torbay: anchorage for the blockade of Brest (from 1798)  1.41

Torbay (70), HMS (1719)  2.35

Torch, Operation  2.74–5

Toulon  3.71

Toulon fleet (French)  2.14

Toulon squadron (French)  2.16

trade routes: protection of leads to expansion of naval forces  1.47

Trafalgar, Battle of (1805)

      HMS Conqueror (74) present at  1.32

      HMS Pickle (sloop) present at  1.32

treenails: Samuel Bentham’s improved method of driving  1.63

Tremendous (74), HMS (1807)

      recaulked at Sheerness (1811)  1.11

       Robert Seppings’ repairs at Chatham (1810) and captain’s report (1811)  1.10–11, 14

      Sir Charles Yorke and Sir Joseph Yorke visit (1810)  1.11

Trevithick, Thomas: cast-iron Thames Tunnel  1.65

Trial, The (Carlile)  3.78

Trigge, Sir Thomas, acting Governor of Gibraltar (1803–1804)  2.83, 84

Trincomalee: operational repair base proposed (1942)  2.78

Trincomalee (38), HMS (1817): copper sheathing  3.28n54

Tripoli, Barbary regency  2.11

troops, supply of in Spain and Portugal after Trafalgar  1.47

Troubridge, Sir Thomas  1.60

      career  1.85n

Truelove transport (1801)  2.61

Truman Annexe, Florida  3.92

Tucker, Benjamin, Clerk of the Cheque at Portsmouth Dockyard

      agent victualler  2.59

      ally of St Vincent  1.59

      brother of Joseph  1.59

Tucker, Joseph, master shipwright at Plymouth Dockyard

      ally of St Vincent  1.59, 78

      brother of Benjamin  1.59

      Conqueror, HMS (74), inventory of tasks completed in Plymouth on  1.34

      dockyard papers for ships present at Trafalgar  1.32

      fitting out ships, work done  1.32

      opposes Robert Seppings’ system of diagonal riders  1.17

      Ordinary, work done to prepare ships  1.32

      Pickle, HMS, inventory of tasks completed in Plymouth on  1.34

Tucker, Malcolm

      and Rosia water tanks  2.84

       ‘Structural Ironwork at Pembroke Dock, a Microcosm of Naval Practice’  3.31–6

Tunis, Barbary regency  2.11

Turkey: pirates  3.67

Tweedmouth, Edward Marjoribanks, 2nd Baron, First Lord of the Admiralty  3.46

Tyger (50), HMS (1722)  2.34, 35

Tyler, Colonel  2.58

U

Unicorn (20), HMS (1776): coppered at Randall’s yard  3.19

Unity tender: storeship at Gibraltar  2.35

University of Portsmouth  3.90

Utrecht, Treaty of  2.7, 31

V

Valetta, Malta

      construction (16th c.)  3.70

      galley arsenal (1570)  3.70

      location map  3.67

      naval dockyard at  2.66

      victualling yard at  2.57

Valiant, HMS: repaired at Alexandria (1941)  2.74

van Heemskerck, Jacob: destroys the Spanish fleet at Gibraltar (1607)  2.10

Vanguard (floating battery), HMS  2.41, 42, 43

Vanguard, HMS (1909): build time  3.49n19

Varlo, Philip and Mary, supply blocks to the Royal Navy in the 1770s  1.60

Vass, Nicholas  1.97

Vaughan, ?, victualling agent at Gibraltar  2.15–16

Venerable, HMS (1899): build time  3.49n19

Venice

      Arsenale  3.89, 92, 93

      docks dismantled (1917)  3.89

Venice Merchant  2.27

Ventova, Giovanni Battista: arsenal at Birgu, Malta  3.70

Venus transport (1800)  2.62

verdigris (electrolysis)  3.16 see also electrolysis

Vernon, John, Master of the Metal Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard (1807)  1.72, 78

Vickers shipyard, Barrow-in-Furness  3.41, 47, 49n19, 84, 85

      builds HM Submarine Resolution (1966)  3.85

Victoria, Juan José Navarro, 1st Marquis de la  2.15

Victory (100), HMS (1765)

      coppered (1780)  3.22

      at Gibraltar after Trafalgar  2.83

      repair in Chatham Dockyard (1802–1803)

            bulwarks raised and built up  1.31

            cost of (£70,933)  1.31

            figurehead replaced with simpler design  1.31

            gun ports added (two) 31

            magazine rebuilt to new regulations  1.31

            re-commissioned (9 April 1803)  1.31

            second survey reveals more work needed than originally planned  1.31

            stern davits removed  1.31

            upper- and quarterdeck levels rebuilt with closed stern  1.31

      spends 658 days (1814–1816) in dry dock in Portsmouth Dockyard  1.50

      Samuel Sutton, new commander at re-commissioning (9 April 1803)  1.31

victualling, naval: daily proportion of provisions  2.55–6

Victualling Agent, Portsmouth

      office in St Mary’s Street  1.35

      residence in St Thomas Street  1.35

      salary increases (1796 and 1800)  1.40, 45n

      supplies stores to Nelson’s fleet off Cadiz (1805)  1.41

      supplies stores to Torbay and Plymouth (1799)  1.41

victualling agents afloat, see agents victualler

Victualling Board

      abolition proposed (1832)  3.76

      accountant for cash (1814)  3.77

      bake house (1740) in King Street, Portsmouth  1.35, 43

      biscuit, contracts for  1.43

      brewhouses (1758 and 1782)

            at Weevil  1.36

            horses for raising water  1.45n

            production figures  1.43–44

            pumphouse and reservoir at Weevil  1.36

      costs of stores shipped to Gibraltar (1681)  2.25

      facilities in Portsmouth and Gosport  1.35

      instructions for victualling agents  2.56

      land at Weevil transferred from Ordnance Board (1828)  1.37

      in Malta  3.73

      offered space by the Ordnance Board at Gun Wharf in exchange for building a new store  1.37

      provisions shipped to Gibraltar (1800 and 1801)  2.61

      return of victualling stores at Gibraltar (5 April 1800)  2.62

      transports to Gibraltar (1800 and 1801)  2.61, 62

Victualling Office in Portsmouth and Gosport

      Samuel Bentham’s technological developments not possible  1.37

      Clerk of the Cheque

            office in St Mary’s Street  1.35

            salary increase (1800)  1.45

      contracts with Cort for iron hoops (1780)  3.52

      cooperage, Weevil (1766)  1.36

      Grand Storehouse bought from Ordnance Board  1.37

      local impact 1793–1815  1.35, 42, 43

      Master Brewer

            residence at Weevil  1.36

            responsible for horses for the brewhouse  1.45n

      Master Cooper

            disputes with Lieutenant Benamor  1.40

            residence at Weevil  1.36

      New Gun Wharf at Portsmouth (from 1811)  1.37

      numbers employed  1.35, 40, 42–43

      predictions of demand at Portsmouth and Plymouth  1.40, 41

      pumphouse and reservoir for brewhouses at Weevil  1.36

      Royal Clarence Yard  1.37

      San Ildefonso (74) used as a storeship at Spithead  1.36

      seasonal demand for victualling  1.40

      single system with Deptford and Plymouth  1.37, 43

      Square Tower  1.36

      storehouses (1740 and 1782)  1.36

      Storekeeper

            office in St Mary’s Street  1.35

            salary increase (1800)  1.45n

      supplies military transports  1.40

      theft and pilfering from  1.37, 39

      tidal mill (1746)  1.36, 43

      Victualling Wharf  1.36, 37

      Weevil site  1.35, 36, 37

victualling yards

      Gibraltar, see Gibraltar victualling yard

      Palermo (1805–08)  2.63

      Rosia Bay (1812)  2.57

      Valetta  2.63

Vie (or Vié), John  3.59

Viegas, Juaquin  2.61

Ville de Paris (110), HMS (1764), lost in a hurricane (1782)  3.24

Villiers de l’Isle Adam  3.70

Vivian, John  1.84

Von der Tann, SMS: at Jutland  3.44

Voorland (Dutch East India Company ship): stays in dock in Portsmouth for repair for 65 days  1.102

Vulture (merchant) coppered (1778)  3.23

W

Wager, Vice-Admiral Sir Charles  2.13–14

            at Gibraltar (1726/7)  2.34, 43–4

      fails to capture the Flota  2.35

Wales, copper mines see Anglesey, copper mines

Wales, Prince of: visits Portsmouth Dockyard (1803)  1.93

Wales, Princess of: visits Portsmouth Dockyard (1805)  1.93

Walker, W.: surgeon at Portsmouth Dockyard  1.104

Walpole, Horace  1.101

Walton, John: headmaster of the Naval Academy  1.98

Ward, Henry, Jr, Foreman of the Joiners at Chatham Dockyard  3.62

Ware, Martin  1.98

Watkinson, Harold, Minister of Defence (1960)  3.85

Watson, Major Francis, and ‘Mill’d lead’ sheathing  3.10

Watt, James

      and mechanisation  1.81

      proposes Robert Seppings to the Royal Society  1.16

      works with Matthew Boulton and Josiah Wedgwood  1.65

Watts, Sir Philip, Director of Naval Construction  3.38, 48n3

      and Dreadnought (1905)  3.40, 42

Wedgwood, Josiah

      and mechanisation  1.81

      works with Matthew Boulton and James Watt  1.65

Weevil

      brewhouses at (1758 and 1762)  1.36

      Cooperage (1766)  1.36

      Master Brewer’s residence  1.36

      Master Cooper’s residence  1.36

      Ordnance Board land transferred to the Victualling Board  1.(1828)  1.37

      pumphouse and reservoir at  1.36

      Royal Clarence Yard, new victualling facilities (1828)  1.37

Wells, John, FRS: at presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.11

Wellstead, John, foreman of sailmakers  1.105

West Indies: military expedition to (November 1795) with 18,740 troops in 200 transports  1.40

Weymouth, Thomas Thynne, Viscount  2.38

Wharton, Philip, 1st Duke of  2.14

Where are we going: A review of the Supporting Organisation to Serve the Fleet  3.83

Whidbey (or Whidby), Joseph

      Master Attendant of Woolwich Dockyard  1.79

      Plymouth breakwater constructor, Admiralty policy-maker  1.17

White, Arnold  3.47

‘white stuff’, for sheathing ships  3.10

Whitmore, William, engineer  1.76

      career  1.84n

Wilkie, Patrick: agent victualler at Malta  2.59

Wilkin, F. S., ‘The contribution of Portsmouth Royal Dockyard to the success of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic War 1793–1815’  1.47–58

Wilkins, Robert  1.95

Wilkinson, Tate  1.98

Williams, Robert, and shipworm  3.13

Williams, Thomas, MP  1.76, 78

career  1.84

William Bruce transport (1800)  2.61

Wills, William: agent victualler to the fleet  2.56, 63

Wilson, Admiral of the Fleet Sir Arthur: and fire-control systems  3.46–7, 48, 50n48

Wimbledon, Edward Cecil, 1st Viscount  2.10, 19

Winchester (50), HMS (1717)  2.34, 35

Winchester College  1.97

Windmill Hill  2.83

Windsor, Dean and Chapter of  1.97

Windsor transport (1800)  2.62

Winget, Rochester  3.82, 83

Winooski, HMS  2.77

Winslow, Rear-Admiral A. L., Commanding Officer of Torpedo and Submarine Flotillas  3.48n3

Wismayer, Joseph  3.72

Wolfe, James  1.94

Wollaston, William, Principal Secretary of the Royal Society

      letter in favour of Robert Seppings’ principles (27 December 1811)  1.13

      at presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.11

Wood Mill erected in Chatham Dockyard (1813)  1.25

Wood Mills in Portsmouth Dockyard, see Portsmouth Royal Dockyard

Woolwich: as Admiralty borough (after 1832)  3.79

Woolwich Royal Dockyard

      builds HMS Minerva (50) with copper bolts and sheathing (1778)  3.21

      Clerk of the Cheque’s office  3.76–7

      Commissioner (1819)  3.78

      coppers HMS Alarm (30) (1761)  3.13

      coppers HMS Alarm (30) (1763)  3.15

      coppers HMS Dolphin (24) (1764)  3.15

      horse mortar mills  1.67

      iron roofs 1.27, 3.33

      Master Attendants

            Joseph Whidby (or Whidbey)  1.79

      Master Boat Builders

            Edward Hunt  1.105

      Master Shipwrights

            Martin Ware  1.98

      part-coppers and part-sheathes HMS Merlin (1762)  3.12, 13

      part-coppers HMS Renown (30) (1762)  3.10

      religious conformity (1819)  3.78

      steamships, Oliver Lang builds at for the Royal Navy 17

      surveys HMS Alarm on her return from Jamaica (1763)  3.14

      Timber Master and officer  3.76, 78

      workforce (1824)  3.76

X

X1, HM Submarine: built at Chatham (1923)  3.85

xili (Lindos)  3.68

Y

Yarmouth (70), HMS (1709)  2.35

Yeo, James: agent victualler  2.59

Yexley, Lionel  3.43

York (60), HMS (1706)  2.34

Yorke, Sir Charles, First Lord of the Admiralty (1810–1812)

      at the reading of Robert Seppings’ paper on 10 March 1814  1.15

      involvement in Robert Seppings’ system  1.10, 16, 17

      visits HMS Tremendous (74) at Chatham (1810)  1.11

Yorke, Admiral Sir Joseph

      at the reading of Robert Seppings’ paper on 10 March 1814  1.15

      visits HMS Tremendous (74) at Chatham (1810)  1.11

Yorktown, British surrender at  2.47, 49

Young, Dr Thomas, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society

      analysis of Robert Seppings’ principles, pure science vs practical experience  1.13

      appointed to the Board of Longitude (1818)  1.13–14

      at presentation of Robert Seppings’ paper (19 November 1811)  1.11

      proposes Robert Seppings to the Royal Society  1.16

Young, Admiral William  1.76

Z

Zeiss range finder  3.45

zinc sheathing, for merchant vessels  3.23